November 29, 2021

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PNAS: It’s amazing discovery that fever can fight cancers

PNAS: It's amazing discovery that fever can fight cancers

PNAS: It’s amazing discovery that fever can fight cancers

 

 

PNAS: It’s amazing discovery that fever can fight cancers. Historically, there have been many examples of cancer patients who have cured themselves without treatment.

Among them, there are traces to follow, high fever is one of them. Therefore, many scholars have speculated that it may be that cancer cells cannot survive in a high temperature environment. After the body temperature rises, a large number of cancer cells can die, and the reproductive ability of the remaining cancer cells is also greatly reduced, and the phenomenon of tumor self-healing occurs.

Therefore, people have questioned whether “small illnesses continue, serious illnesses are not committed” is the truth or a rumor?

Recently, a research team led by Professor Erika L. Pearce of the Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Germany has provided a scientific answer to this question. The team published an article in the journal PNAS entitled Fever supports CD8+ effector T cell responses by promoting mitochondrial translation. It is found that the increase in body temperature is beneficial to optimize the metabolic activity and function of CD8+ T cells, enhance the translation efficiency of mitochondrial proteins, and effectively resist the invasion of cancer cells.

PNAS: It's amazing discovery that fever can fight cancers

 

 

Fever is a common symptom of human inflammation and infection. When the human immune system is stimulated by viral pathogens, it will cause white blood cells to secrete mediator cytokines and synthesize prostaglandins under the catalysis of enzymes. After the prostaglandins enter the hypothalamus, the body temperature control center will The body temperature set point is raised to deal with the virus. With the deepening of research in recent years, the medical community has inferred that this fever may be related to the early activation of T cells that secrete large amounts of cytokines and cytotoxic molecules.

In order to simulate the heating process of the human body in vitro, the researchers used anti-CD3/CD28 to activate purified CD8 + T cells at 37°C and 39°C respectively. After 24 hours of culture, they found that the high temperature activated CD8 + T cells It can secrete more cytokines. At the same time, because the body’s metabolism is accelerated during fever, the glucose metabolism is strengthened, and the decomposition of liver glycogen and muscle glycogen increases, so the expression of glucose metabolism-related molecules also increases.

In addition, CD8+ T cells activated by high temperature will transform from resting naive T cells to fully activated effector T cells, producing cytokines and cytotoxic molecules that can control the growth of pathogens or tumors. Not only that, in the evolution of T cells, there will be a phenomenon of “reprogramming” in carbohydrate metabolism. With people’s deep understanding of tumor biology and the complexity of tumor metabolism, it has been discovered that this phenomenon is an important aspect of malignant tumors. Sign.

Subsequently, the researchers adopted these activated T cells into myeloid leukemia mice, and they were pleasantly surprised to find that the anti-tumor response in the mice was enhanced, and the survival rate of leukemia mice injected with T cells stimulated at 39°C increased significantly. This further shows that fever beneficially enhances host immunity.

It is well known that mitochondria can regulate the energy level and redox state of cells, and influence the fate of tumor cells through multiple signal transduction pathways. Mitochondrial translation elongation factor 4 (mtEF4) is the “switch” of the process of mitochondrial protein translation, which is involved in the occurrence of tumors. Play an important role in the development process.

Therefore, the researchers re-adoptively transferred 39°C T cells treated with mitochondrial translation inhibitor (Antibiotic tigecycline, TIG) into a mouse model of myeloid leukemia, and found that the 39°C T cells treated with TIG had anti-tumor ability in mice. Attenuation, indicating that mitochondrial translation factors are indispensable for 39℃ T cells in regulating the anti-tumor process

 

 

Historically, there have been many examples of cancer patients who have cured themselves without treatment. Among them, there are traces to follow, high fever is one of them. Therefore, many scholars have speculated that it may be that cancer cells cannot survive in a high temperature environment. After the body temperature rises, a large number of cancer cells can die, and the reproductive ability of the remaining cancer cells is also greatly reduced, and the phenomenon of tumor self-healing occurs. Therefore, people have questioned whether “small illnesses continue, serious illnesses are not committed” is the truth or a rumor?

Recently, a research team led by Professor Erika L. Pearce of the Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Germany has provided a scientific answer to this question. The team published an article in the journal PNAS entitled Fever supports CD8+ effector T cell responses by promoting mitochondrial translation. It is found that the increase in body temperature is beneficial to optimize the metabolic activity and function of CD8+ T cells, enhance the translation efficiency of mitochondrial proteins, and effectively resist the invasion of cancer cells.

Fever is a common symptom of human inflammation and infection. When the human immune system is stimulated by viral pathogens, it will cause white blood cells to secrete mediator cytokines and synthesize prostaglandins under the catalysis of enzymes. After the prostaglandins enter the hypothalamus, the body temperature control center will The body temperature set point is raised to deal with the virus. With the deepening of research in recent years, the medical community has inferred that this fever may be related to the early activation of T cells that secrete large amounts of cytokines and cytotoxic molecules.

In order to simulate the heating process of the human body in vitro, the researchers used anti-CD3/CD28 to activate purified CD8 + T cells at 37°C and 39°C respectively. After 24 hours of culture, they found that the high temperature activated CD8 + T cells It can secrete more cytokines. At the same time, because the body’s metabolism is accelerated during fever, the glucose metabolism is strengthened, and the decomposition of liver glycogen and muscle glycogen increases, so the expression of glucose metabolism-related molecules also increases.

In addition, CD8+ T cells activated by high temperature will transform from resting naive T cells to fully activated effector T cells, producing cytokines and cytotoxic molecules that can control the growth of pathogens or tumors. Not only that, in the evolution of T cells, there will be a phenomenon of “reprogramming” in carbohydrate metabolism. With people’s deep understanding of tumor biology and the complexity of tumor metabolism, it has been discovered that this phenomenon is an important aspect of malignant tumors. Sign.

Subsequently, the researchers adopted these activated T cells into myeloid leukemia mice, and they were pleasantly surprised to find that the anti-tumor response in the mice was enhanced, and the survival rate of leukemia mice injected with T cells stimulated at 39°C increased significantly. This further shows that fever beneficially enhances host immunity.

It is well known that mitochondria can regulate the energy level and redox state of cells, and influence the fate of tumor cells through multiple signal transduction pathways. Mitochondrial translation elongation factor 4 (mtEF4) is the “switch” of the process of mitochondrial protein translation, which is involved in the occurrence of tumors. Play an important role in the development process.

Therefore, the researchers re-adoptively transferred 39°C T cells treated with mitochondrial translation inhibitor (Antibiotic tigecycline, TIG) into a mouse model of myeloid leukemia, and found that the 39°C T cells treated with TIG had anti-tumor ability in mice. Attenuation, indicating that mitochondrial translation factors are indispensable for 39℃ T cells in regulating the anti-tumor process

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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