September 25, 2022

Medical Trend

Medical News and Medical Resources

More than 70% of COVID-19 patients still have sequelae after one year

More than 70% of COVID-19 patients still have sequelae after one year



 

More than 70% of COVID-19 patients still have sequelae after one year. 

The Lancet: One year after discharge from the COVID-19, more than 70% of patients still have sequelae

The new coronavirus usually infects humans through the respiratory tract and causes damage to the respiratory system and various organs of the human body.

Since the first outbreak at the end of 2019, the novel coronavirus is still raging around the world, causing great negative impact on the world economy and society.

 

In the two years since the epidemic, we have realized that the COVID-19 is not just a respiratory disease, but affects multiple tissues and organs of the human body.

For example, it affects the central nervous system, resulting in loss of smell and taste, fatigue, cognitive decline, and in some patients, stroke and more severe impairment of consciousness.

There are even some studies reporting that some young people have symptoms related to Parkinson’s disease after contracting the COVID-19, which is part of what is known as the sequelae of the COVID-19.

 

On April 23, 2022, researchers from the University of Leicester in the UK published online in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: Clinical characteristics with inflammation profiling of long COVID and association with 1-year recovery following hospitalisation in the UK: a research paper for a prospective observational study .

 

The study of more than 2,000 hospitalized patients with Covid-19 showed that only 29% of patients fully recovered after a year of infection with Covid-19, and 71% had sequelae , the most common sequelae being fatigue, muscle pain, slowing down, sleep Poor and difficult to breathe.

 

More than 70% of COVID-19 patients still have sequelae after one year

 

 

For the study, researchers analysed patients from 39 UK National Health Service (NHS) hospitals, including 2320 adult participants discharged between March 7, 2020 and April 18, 2021, of whom 807 Participants (32.7%) underwent follow – up assessments at 5 months and 1 year after discharge.

The mean age was 59 years, 279 (36%) were women, and 28% received invasive mechanical ventilation.

 

Recovery was assessed using patient-reported outcome measures, physical performance, and organ function at 5 months and 1 year after discharge.

The researchers also took blood samples from the participants during the five-month visit to analyze them for the presence of various inflammatory proteins.

 

Statistical analysis found that 25.5% of patients reported complete recovery 5 months after discharge, and 28.9% reported complete recovery 1 year after discharge.

 

More than 70% of COVID-19 patients still have sequelae after one yearPatient recovery status at 5 months and 1 year

 

 

The study found that compared with men, women were 32 percent less likely to make a full recovery ; those who were obese were 50 percent less likely to make a full recovery ; and those who required mechanical ventilation were 58 percent less likely to make a full recovery .

 

The results showed that being female, being obese and being mechanically ventilated in the hospital were all associated with a lower likelihood of a full recovery after one year. The most common sequelae are fatigue, muscle pain, slowing down, poor sleep and difficulty breathing.

 

More than 70% of COVID-19 patients still have sequelae after one yearComparison of patient recovery outcomes at 5 months and 1 year

 

 

In the study, the limited recovery in symptoms, mental health, exercise capacity, organ damage and quality of life from five months to one year after hospitalization was striking, the researchers said.

 

They also highlighted that being female and obesity were major risk factors for non-recovery after 1 year, as being female and obesity were associated with more severe ongoing health impairments, including decreased exercise performance and health-related quality of life.

 

With a lack of treatments for COVID-19 sequelae, findings underscore the urgent need for healthcare services to support this large and rapidly growing patient population with numerous symptoms, including decreased exercise capacity and health-related quality of life a year later dramatically drop.

 

Without effective treatments, COVID-19 sequelae could become a highly prevalent new long-term disease, researchers say.

 

 

 

 

Reference:
https://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(22)00127-8

More than 70% of COVID-19 patients still have sequelae after one year

(source:internet, reference only)


Disclaimer of medicaltrend.org