June 27, 2022

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Microchip implanted in the stomach can produce satiety

Microchip implanted in the stomach can produce satiety

 

 

 

Microchip implanted in the stomach can produce satiety.

 

“Nature Communications” Magazine: New Technology for Weight Loss! Microchip implanted in the stomach can produce satiety.

 

The journal Nature Communications published a new study that implanted a small microchip into the stomach to stimulate specific nerve endings to produce a feeling of fullness. This technology can be used to lose weight in the future.

 

Sung II Park, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Texas A&M University in the United States, introduced that obesity is a global epidemic that greatly increases the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and even certain cancers. Caused $147 billion in economic losses.

 

The human vagus nerve can provide brain satiety information from the inner layer of the stomach. Therefore, nerve stimulation therapy that uses it as a target for the treatment of obesity has attracted widespread attention. There are some medical devices that can stimulate the vagus nerve endings and help suppress hunger, but they are similar to a pacemaker and need to be connected to a current wire to provide an electric shock to activate the nerve endings, which is very inconvenient.

 

Park said that the use of wireless technology and advanced optical tools to stimulate the nerve endings with light to provide a sense of satiety may make the nerve stimulation equipment less bulky. We hope to implant microchips through minimally traumatic surgery to stimulate specific nerve endings in the stomach and provide updated treatment options for patients who would otherwise need surgery to lose weight, making them more comfortable.

 

Park said that despite the wireless system, there is currently no device that can perform long-term and durable specific operations on neuronal activity in any organ other than the brain. Therefore, we used genetic tools to express light-responsive genes to specific vagus nerve endings in the body, and then used a tiny paddle-shaped device, which was fixed in the stomach and inserted into a tiny light-emitting diode. The device was equipped with external A microchip required for wireless communication with a radio frequency source. When the external radio frequency source is turned on, the light emitted by the LED can stimulate the nerves to provide a sense of satiety and inhibit hunger.

 

Park expects that researchers in the fields of electronics, materials science and neuroscience applied basic research are very interested in wireless optogenetics, identifying peripheral neural pathways that control appetite and other behaviors, and have become a research hotspot in the field. The latest tools can stimulate the neuronal function of the peripheral nervous system in ways that are currently unimaginable. Looking to the future, with little or no genetic modification, these devices can be used to manipulate the nerve endings of the entire gastrointestinal tract and other organs to achieve brand-new functions.

 

 

 

“Nature Communications” Magazine: New Technology for Weight Loss! Microchip implanted in the stomach can produce satiety

According to a report on the Medicalxpress website, the journal Nature Communications published a new study that implanted a small microchip into the stomach to stimulate specific nerve endings to produce a feeling of fullness. This technology can be used to lose weight in the future.

 

Sung II Park, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Texas A&M University in the United States, introduced that obesity is a global epidemic that greatly increases the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and even certain cancers. Caused $147 billion in economic losses.

 

The human vagus nerve can provide brain satiety information from the inner layer of the stomach. Therefore, nerve stimulation therapy that uses it as a target for the treatment of obesity has attracted widespread attention.

There are some medical devices that can stimulate the vagus nerve endings and help suppress hunger, but they are similar to a pacemaker and need to be connected to a current wire to provide an electric shock to activate the nerve endings, which is very inconvenient.

 

Park said that the use of wireless technology and advanced optical tools to stimulate the nerve endings with light to provide a sense of satiety may make the nerve stimulation equipment less bulky. We hope to implant microchips through minimally traumatic surgery to stimulate specific nerve endings in the stomach and provide updated treatment options for patients who would otherwise need surgery to lose weight, making them more comfortable.

 

Park said that despite the wireless system, there is currently no device that can perform long-term and durable specific operations on neuronal activity in any organ other than the brain.

Therefore, we used genetic tools to express light-responsive genes to specific vagus nerve endings in the body, and then used a tiny paddle-shaped device, which was fixed in the stomach and inserted into a tiny light-emitting diode.

The device was equipped with external A microchip required for wireless communication with a radio frequency source. When the external radio frequency source is turned on, the light emitted by the LED can stimulate the nerves to provide a sense of satiety and inhibit hunger.

 

Park expects that researchers in the fields of electronics, materials science and neuroscience applied basic research are very interested in wireless optogenetics, identifying peripheral neural pathways that control appetite and other behaviors, and have become a research hotspot in the field.

The latest tools can stimulate the neuronal function of the peripheral nervous system in ways that are currently unimaginable. Looking to the future, with little or no genetic modification, these devices can be used to manipulate the nerve endings of the entire gastrointestinal tract and other organs to achieve brand-new functions.

 

 

 

 

(sourceinternet, reference only)


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