September 25, 2022

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How much do cancer patients pay for CAT-T immunotherapy?

How much do cancer patients pay for CAT-T immunotherapy?



 

How much do cancer patients pay for CAT-T immunotherapy?

 

Researchers once did a study and found that 10% of cancer patients had to give up some treatments in tears because of lack of money, and up to 52% of cancer patients had financial crisis.

Although many patients cannot afford it, there are still many wealthy patients who are willing to pay for expensive treatments.

 

How much do cancer patients pay for CAT-T immunotherapy?

 

A single injection can kill cancer cells, what exactly is CAR-T therapy?

 

CAR-T therapy is currently the most popular immunotherapy. It refers to the use of genetic engineering methods to modify patients’ peripheral blood T cells in vitro, transforming T cells so that they have the characteristics of recognizing tumor cell surface antigens, and in vitro diffusion culture.

It is then injected back into the patient’s body to kill cancer cells.

 

The main products currently on the market are 7 CAR-T therapies:

 

1. Kymriah: $475,000

For the treatment of follicular lymphoma, the overall response rate was 86.2% and the complete response rate was 69.1%.

2. Carvykti (Sidaji Orensai injection): $433.77

For the treatment of multiple myeloma, the overall response rate is 98%, the complete response rate is 78%

3. Abecma: $437,900

For the treatment of multiple myeloma, the overall response rate is 72%, the complete response rate is 28%

4. Breyanzi: $410,300

For the treatment of large B-cell lymphoma, the overall response rate is 73% and the complete response rate is 54%

5. Tecartus: $393,000

For the treatment of relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, the overall response rate is 93% and the complete response rate is 67%

6. Yescarta: $373,000

For the treatment of large B-cell lymphoma, the overall response rate is 83%, and the complete response rate is 65%

7. Relma-cel (Ruiji Orensai injection):  $192.73

For the treatment of large B-cell lymphoma, the overall response rate is 75.9% and the complete response rate is 51.7%

 

Have you found that the above products are basically for the treatment of hematological tumors, not solid tumors?

This is the difficulty in the development of CAR-T therapy. Compared with hematological tumors, solid tumors are the bulk of cancer treatment.

 

 

 

Why is CAR-T therapy so expensive?

 

High R&D costs and risks:

Pharmaceutical companies have to bear huge costs and risks before a product is approved.

All new products need to be able to pay for their own development costs, as well as a portion of the development costs for unmarketed products.

 

Personalized treatments:

Most new treatments are expensive to develop, but relatively inexpensive to manufacture on a large scale. 

Once you have the right chemical formula, the process of producing a million pills means the cost per pill can be small. 

However, CAR-T therapy is a personalized treatment hand. Under the current technology, each patient receiving CAR-T therapy has different “drugs”, which greatly increases the cost of treatment.

 

High requirements for preparation environment:

As a living cell drug, preparation requires extremely high environmental cleanliness. Each patient is an independent batch, and each batch of products needs to be fully tested.

Only a rigorous production process and strict quality control can ensure the maximum clinical safety and efficacy, as well as a shorter product preparation cycle and higher Preparation success rate, which is of great significance for patients with relapsed and refractory disease.

 

 

The advent of CAR-T products has undoubtedly brought new hope to many patients, but the high cost has also discouraged many patients.

It is hoped that the medical community can develop products with wider application and more affordable prices as soon as possible to change the plight of cancer patients.

 

 

 

How much do cancer patients pay for CAT-T immunotherapy?

(source:internet, reference only)


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