July 25, 2024

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Why is blood type related to cancer?

Why is blood type related to cancer?



Why is blood type related to cancer?

Is there a link between blood type and cancer risk?

Can your blood type predict your likelihood of developing cancer?

The relationship between blood type and cancer has long been a topic of interest and debate.

Blood type is an inherent trait determined by genetics and is considered unalterable.

Does this mean that the occurrence of cancer in individuals with certain blood types is predetermined and unchangeable?

It’s not that simple.

Why is blood type related to cancer?


Is there a connection between blood type and cancer?

Blood types are categorized into various groups, with the most common being the ABO blood type, including A, B, AB, and O types, and the Rh blood type, including Rh-positive and Rh-negative (rare, also known as panda blood).

To explore the possible connection between blood type and cancer, let’s examine several research findings:

  • In 1953, a study in the UK found a correlation between type A blood and the occurrence of stomach cancer.

  • A study published in the journal “PLoS One” in 2017 suggested a certain relationship between different blood types and cancer.

  • A US study revealed a significant association between ABO blood type and pancreatic cancer, with type O individuals being more susceptible. The research suggested that genetic variations in the ABO locus DNA sequence play a role in determining the susceptibility of type O individuals to pancreatic cancer.

  • Another study indicated that individuals with type AB blood have a higher risk of liver cancer.

  • A 1964 study published in “The Lancet” by Norwegian scholars suggested no clear association between ABO blood type and cancer.

  • A large-scale study in China conducted by the research team at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, published in the journal “Public Science Library · Comprehensive,” recruited over 18,000 volunteers. Through more than 20 years of follow-up, the study revealed the relationship between blood types and cancer in the Chinese population.

Despite various research findings, inconsistencies exist, and the relationship between blood type and the occurrence and prognosis of cancer may have some correlation but requires further investigation.

The biological and molecular mechanisms are still under exploration and study.

In summary:

  1. Individuals with A antigen-containing A or AB blood types have a higher cancer risk, while those without A or B antigens (O blood type) have a lower cancer risk. Compared to A blood type, individuals with B blood type have a lower cancer risk.

  2. ABO blood type antigens may play a direct role in the occurrence and metastasis of digestive system tumors, particularly in the highly correlated proliferation and movement of digestive system cells.

  3. ABO blood type shows no significant association with the risk of lung cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer, bone cancer, and connective tissue tumors. The relationship between blood type and ovarian cancer seems inconclusive, with no apparent association between A and B antigens and malignant transformation of ovarian cells.

Relationship between blood types and cancer:

A Blood Type

  • Overall, individuals with type A blood have a higher cancer risk than non-type A individuals.
  • Individuals with type A blood seem more prone to digestive system issues, especially in the stomach, with a higher risk of digestive system cancers, particularly stomach and colorectal cancers.

B Blood Type

  • Overall, individuals with type B blood have a lower risk of most cancers compared to type A individuals.
  • Female individuals with type B blood have a higher risk of cervical cancer but a lower risk of certain cancers such as colorectal and stomach cancers.
  • Compared to ABO blood type, type B blood colon cancer patients seem to have a lower overall survival rate, and type B blood ovarian cancer patients have a shorter survival period.

AB Blood Type

  • Male individuals with type AB blood seem to have a higher cancer risk than females.
  • Compared to other blood types, individuals with type AB blood have an increased risk of liver cancer, with the highest risk among AB individuals.
  • Individuals with type AB blood have a lower risk of certain cancers, including squamous cell carcinoma, stomach cancer (although some studies contradict this), colon cancer, and pancreatic cancer. The risk of sarcoma, lymphoma, and leukemia does not significantly differ from other blood types.
  • The risk of bladder cancer in individuals with type AB blood is comparable to that in individuals with type A blood.
  • Compared to type A blood, individuals with type AB or O blood have a lower risk of pancreatic cancer. The risk of breast cancer increases in individuals with type AB blood.
  • Overall, the average overall survival of individuals with type AB blood with colon cancer is higher than that of non-AB blood types, but ovarian cancer patients with type AB blood have a lower survival rate.

O Blood Type

  • Overall, individuals with type O blood have a lower cancer risk, approximately 84% compared to non-O blood types.
  • Compared to non-O blood types, individuals with type O blood have a lower risk of various cancers, including stomach, pancreatic, breast, colorectal, ovarian, esophageal, and nasopharyngeal cancers.
  • Individuals with type O blood with stomach, renal cell, and breast cancers may have a higher 5-year survival rate.
  • Compared to type A blood, individuals with type AB or O blood have a lower risk of pancreatic cancer, with type O blood considered a protective factor.
  • The risk of bladder cancer in individuals with type O blood is comparable to that in individuals with type A blood. Compared to type A blood, individuals with type O blood have a lower risk of sarcoma, lymphoma, or leukemia.


Why is blood type related to cancer?

The exact mechanism behind the relationship between ABO blood type and the occurrence and development of cancer is not fully understood.

Some scholars propose that ABO blood type antigens may influence systemic inflammatory responses, and chronic inflammation is associated with cancer development. Research indicates that individuals with type A blood may be more susceptible to Helicobacter pylori infection, increasing the risk of stomach cancer.

Others suggest that the structure of certain tumor antigens is similar to that of ABO blood type antigens, especially type A antigens. Therefore, these tumor antigens may mimic blood type antigens, allowing them to evade recognition and attack by the immune system.

In conclusion, due to the unclear and sometimes contradictory relationship between blood type and cancer, the research on the underlying mechanisms is still speculative.

It’s important to note:

  1. Cancer is a result of multifactorial influences, and there is currently no consensus on the connection between blood type and cancer. Different research findings may present conflicting conclusions, necessitating further investigation.

  2. Avoid simplistic comparisons, refrain from labeling yourself, and resist panic. Instead, use this information as motivation for proactive cancer prevention actions. If a specific blood type is associated with a higher risk of a certain cancer, engaging in preventive measures might lower the risk.

  3. Individuals in appropriate age groups and high-risk populations should prioritize cancer screening.

  4. Seek timely medical attention if you experience any abnormal or uncomfortable symptoms.

Why is blood type related to cancer?


(source:internet, reference only)

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Important Note: The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as medical advice.