June 19, 2024

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Increased Risk of 17 Different Cancers in Overweight Men

Research Reveals Increased Risk of 17 Different Cancers in Overweight Men



Research Reveals Increased Risk of 17 Different Cancers in Overweight Men

While we often try to move beyond our past, our biology tends to have other ideas.

Researchers have found that men who were overweight in their younger years face significantly higher risks of developing 17 different types of cancer.

In two new studies, scientists at the University of Gothenburg examined the body mass index (BMI) of 1,489,115 Swedish men who enlisted between 1968 and 2005, independent of aerobic fitness levels. During the follow-up period, around 84,621 individuals were diagnosed with some form of cancer.

 

Research Reveals Increased Risk of 17 Different Cancers in Overweight Men

 

 

They discovered that individuals with higher BMI at enlistment had increased risks of lung, head and neck, brain, thyroid, esophageal, stomach, pancreatic, liver, colon, rectal, kidney, bladder cancers, malignant melanoma, leukemia, myeloma, and lymphomas (Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s).

The lead author of the study, Aron Onerup from the University of Gothenburg, stated, “Being overweight or obese in younger years seems to increase the risk of cancer; we found an association between unhealthy weight and nearly all organ-based cancers. Given the worrying trend of childhood and adolescent obesity, this research further emphasizes the need for substantial resources to reverse this trend.”

Interestingly, among men with a BMI in the “normal” range (18.5-24.9), specifically between 20 and 22.4, there were already elevated rates of certain cancers. These included head and neck cancers, esophageal, stomach, pancreatic, liver, kidney cancers, as well as malignant melanoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Maria Åberg, a professor of family medicine at the University of Gothenburg and a senior author, said, “This suggests that the current definition of normal weight might be more suitable for older individuals, while optimal weight for younger people might be within a lower range. Our research group came to similar conclusions regarding early adulthood BMI and later cardiovascular diseases.”

 

Research Reveals Increased Risk of 17 Different Cancers in Overweight Men

 

 

While BMI is commonly believed to be an incomplete reflection of an individual’s weight or health status, the research found a significant association between cancer and these measures.

Individuals with high BMI upon enlistment had a three to four times higher risk of developing abdominal cancers (including esophageal, stomach, and kidney cancers). Currently, weight issues in Sweden are estimated to contribute to 15%-25% of these cancer cases.

Researchers anticipate a substantial increase in weight-related cancer incidence in the next 30 years. For instance, they predict that 32% of stomach cancer cases and 37% of esophageal cancer cases will be associated with historical weight issues.

Furthermore, data analysis shows that overweight or obese men have two to three times higher odds of dying within five years after diagnosis of skin cancer, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, thyroid cancer, bladder cancer, and prostate cancer compared to normal-weight individuals. The chances of death from head and neck, colorectal, and kidney cancers are twice as high.

This study links high BMI in over 2.6 million Spanish adults to a higher risk of 18 different cancers.

Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States currently state that weight impacts the incidence of 13 different cancers. However, the CDC emphasizes that cancer is not an inevitable result of obesity at any stage of life and that risks can be reduced through lifestyle improvements or medical intervention. It also stresses the importance of vigilant health checks and monitoring early signs of disease. The Swedish researchers also point out that as people age and become more susceptible to these cancers, the prevalence of obesity will undoubtedly strain healthcare systems.

This research has been published in the journals “Obesity” and “Cancer Medicine.”

Research Reveals Increased Risk of 17 Different Cancers in Overweight Men


(source:internet, reference only)

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