February 24, 2024

Medical Trend

Medical News and Medical Resources

Study Finds Viagra Lowers Alzheimer’s Risk by 18%

Study Finds Viagra Lowers Alzheimer’s Risk by 18%



Study Finds Viagra Lowers Alzheimer’s Risk by 18%

Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors like Viagra are renowned for effectively treating erectile dysfunction, but a study involving nearly 270,000 men adds to growing evidence that they may also reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers from University College London (UCL) examined 269,725 male participants in the UK, with an average age of 59 and no signs of cognitive impairment, recently diagnosed with erectile dysfunction.

In this five-year study, participants were divided into two groups for assessment: one group prescribed erectile dysfunction medication such as sildenafil (Viagra) accounted for 55% of participants, while the other group, comprising 45% of participants, did not receive such treatment for erectile dysfunction.

Study Finds Viagra Lowers Alzheimer's Risk by 18%.

Among the 1,119 participants diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, 749 were taking erectile dysfunction medication while 370 were not. However, when measured per person-year (the number of study participants multiplied by the time each spent in the study), researchers found that the incidence rate of Alzheimer’s among medication users was 8.1 cases per ten thousand person-years, compared to 9.7 cases per ten thousand person-years among those not taking erectile dysfunction medication.

After accounting for other factors such as age and lifestyle, including smoking and alcohol consumption, researchers found that those taking the medication had an 18% lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

Lead author of the study, Ruth Brauer from University College London, commented, “While advancements have been made in treatments for Alzheimer’s, such as therapies that clear amyloid plaques from the brain and help early-stage patients recover, there’s still an urgent need for therapies that can prevent or slow the progression of Alzheimer’s. These findings are encouraging and warrant further investigation.”

Significantly, during the study period, the greatest reduction in risk was observed in men who took the medication most frequently (20 times or more). Data also indicated that the medication had a stronger protective effect in men aged 70 and above compared to those under 70.

Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is) have previously shown promising results in animal experiments but evidence in humans has been uncertain. Sildenafil was the first PDE5I developed for treating high blood pressure and angina, later proving revolutionary in treating erectile dysfunction. In 2005, this vasodilator, which promotes blood flow, was repurposed for treating pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Furthermore, research has explored sildenafil’s potential in treating obesity and reducing the risk of colorectal cancer.

The mechanism by which this medication increases blood flow may also affect the brain, promoting circulation and potentially preventing the accumulation of toxic proteins associated with Alzheimer’s. In previous animal studies, PDE5Is also increased the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which plays a role in memory, learning, and involuntary muscle movement, with low levels of acetylcholine linked to Alzheimer’s.

Researchers caution that while this study holds promise, it should be seen as a starting point for further clinical research into how PDE5Is act on the brain. Experts note that lifestyle variables and other factors could “confound” such studies.

Brauer stated, “Further research is needed to confirm these findings, understand the potential benefits and mechanisms of these medications, and investigate the optimal dosage. Randomized controlled trials involving both male and female participants are necessary to determine if these findings also apply to women.”

The study was published in the journal Neurology.

Study Finds Viagra Lowers Alzheimer’s Risk by 18%

(source:internet, reference only)


Disclaimer of medicaltrend.org


Important Note: The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as medical advice.