April 22, 2024

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Kyoto University Study Reveals 1 in 50 Japanese Affected by Strabismus

Kyoto University Study Reveals 1 in 50 Japanese Affected by Strabismus



Kyoto University Study Reveals 1 in 50 Japanese Affected by Strabismus: Analysis by Kyoto University Reveals Results of the World’s First National Survey

According to an analysis by Dr. Manabu Miyata, an associate professor at the Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine specializing in ophthalmology, approximately one in fifty Japanese people suffer from strabismus, a condition where the eyes do not align properly. This finding is based on an analysis of receipt information (medical fee payment details) from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. This survey on strabismus among the entire Japanese population is the first of its kind in the world.

Strabismus is classified into three main types: “exotropia,” where one eye looks outward, “esotropia,” where one eye looks inward, and “hypertropia” or “hypotropia,” where one eye is higher or lower than the other. Strabismus can make it difficult to judge depth, leading to tripping on stairs, and hypertropia can cause double vision.

The survey extracted records of survivors with approximately 80 diseases classified as strabismus, based on receipt claims made from April 2009 to September 2020. Claims related to strabismus totaled 2,709,207, reaching 2.2% of Japan’s total population.

The prevalence rates by age group showed that 7.7% of those aged 10-14 had the highest prevalence, followed by 2.8% for those aged 80-84, with lower rates among the working-age population. Genetics are considered one of the risk factors, and it is believed that screening during school years has led to early detection among younger generations. In the elderly, the increase is thought to be due to age-related muscle weakening that supports the eyeball.

Furthermore, the breakdown of strabismus revealed that the proportion of exotropia was nearly three times higher than that of esotropia. Similar trends were reported in other countries such as China and South Korea, where Asian populations showed a higher prevalence of exotropia, while Western populations such as the United States and Germany had a higher prevalence of esotropia, supporting the genetic influence theory.

Dr. Miyata is further investigating the relationship between strabismus and genetics through a collaborative study with the city of Nagahama in Shiga Prefecture and Kyoto University, utilizing health information from the residents. He stated, “Research from a genetic perspective could lead to the development of new treatment methods.”

The findings were published in an international journal in November last year.

Kyoto University Study Reveals 1 in 50 Japanese Affected by Strabismus: Analysis by Kyoto University Reveals Results of the World's First National Survey

Kyoto University Study Reveals 1 in 50 Japanese Affected by Strabismus

(source:internet, reference only)


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