September 30, 2022

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JAMA: Women with diabetes have a 10-fold increase in risk of early coronary heart disease

JAMA: Women with diabetes have a 10-fold increase in risk of early coronary heart disease

JAMA: Women with diabetes have a 10-fold increase in risk of early coronary heart disease.  Women with type 2 diabetes have a 10-fold increased risk of premature coronary heart disease, and lipoprotein insulin resistance (LPIR) is a powerful predictive biomarker.

JAMA: Women with diabetes have a 10-fold increase in risk of early coronary heart disease

 

A recent study in a JAMA sub-Journal suggests that diabetes is closely related to early-onset coronary heart disease in women (under 55).

Studies have found that women with type 2 diabetes have a 10-fold increase in the risk of early coronary heart disease, and lipoprotein insulin resistance (LPIR) is a powerful predictive biomarker. The lipoprotein insulin resistance (LPIR) score is composed of six lipoprotein parameters determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Researchers analyzed approximately 50 clinical, lipid, inflammatory, and metabolic risk factors and biomarkers related to cardiovascular health. The predictive effect of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (“bad” cholesterol) and glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c is significantly weaker than that of LPIR.

In this study, “bad” cholesterol was only associated with a 40% increase in the risk of early-onset coronary heart disease, while LPIR indicated a 6-fold increase in the risk of early-onset coronary heart disease.

Studies have also found that metabolic syndrome, hypertension, obesity, and smoking are the main causes of premature coronary heart disease in women. The risk of premature coronary artery disease increases by 5 times, 4 times, 4 times and 3 times, respectively. In addition, insufficient physical activity and family history are also some of the reasons.

The researchers analyzed 28,000 women ≥45 years of age without cardiovascular disease. The incidence of coronary heart disease in 4 age groups (ages <55 years, 55-65 years, 65-75 years and ≥75 years old) was studied.

Studies have found that the correlation between most risk factors and coronary heart disease diminishes as the age of onset increases.

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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