September 30, 2022

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What is endometriosis and how to treat it?

What is endometriosis and how to treat it?

 

What is endometriosis and how to treat it?   The biggest danger of endometriosis is that these ectopic endometrial tissues are active. No matter where it goes in the body, it will proliferate, detach, and bleed with the menstrual cycle, causing severe pain.

What is endometriosis and how to treat it?


Dysmenorrhea is so painful that it makes you cry and needs painkillers to relieve it. The menstrual period is irregular, which may be advanced for a while and delayed for a while.

 

 

1. What is endometriosis?

Under normal circumstances, the endometrium should stay in the uterine cavity, but some people’s endometrium is more naughty and like to run away from home, with neat legs and feet, running far away, to the pelvic cavity and abdominal cavity, it will form endometriosis. Position disease, referred to as endometriosis.

The biggest danger of endometriosis is that these ectopic endometrial tissues are active. No matter where it goes in the body, it will proliferate, detach, and bleed with the menstrual cycle, causing severe pain.

The ectopic lesions on the ovaries were caused by repeated bleeding, and the old blood accumulation showed a chocolate color, forming “chocolate cysts.” Because endometriosis has tumor-like characteristics such as implantation, adhesion and recurrence, it is also called “benign disease and malignant behavior.”

 

 

2. The clinical manifestations of endometriosis?

Dysmenorrhea

The main symptom of ectopic disease is gradually worsening secondary dysmenorrhea (not the dysmenorrhea that occurs during menarche). It occurs more than 1 to 2 days before the start of menstruation, the most serious on the first day of menstruation, and gradually decreases thereafter. The pain is mostly in the deep part of the lower abdomen and lumbosacral area, sometimes radiating to the perineum, anus or thigh.

Menstrual abnormalities

Some patients may have symptoms such as increased menstrual flow, prolonged menstrual periods, inexhaustible menstruation, or spotting before menstruation.

Infertility

The infertility rate of patients with endometriosis is as high as 40%, which may be related to factors such as changes in the pelvic immune microenvironment.

Dyspareunia

Generally manifested as deep intercourse pain, more obvious intercourse pain before menstruation.

Acute abdominal pain

A ruptured chocolate cyst can cause transient pain in the lower abdomen or deep pelvis. If a larger cyst ruptures, the fluid in the cyst can flow into the pelvic and abdominal cavity and cause sudden severe abdominal pain, accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and anal swelling.

Other symptoms

Endometriosis to other parts of the pelvic cavity may cause chronic pelvic pain, anal falling pain, back pain, and knife scar pain.

 


3. How to treat?

(1) Natural pain relief methods:

Pregnancy: High levels of progesterone during pregnancy can inhibit the endometrial tissue, and endometriosis will disappear if menstruation does not come during pregnancy. However, endometriosis is not easy to get pregnant. Even if the pregnancy is successful, dysmenorrhea will reappear as menstruation recovers after delivery.

Menopause: Once the ovarian function fails, there is no estrogen and progesterone, the ectopic endometrial tissue is also deprived of nutrients. The vast majority of endometriosis can heal itself.

(2) Methods suitable for long-term use:

Oral painkillers: suitable for mild to moderate dysmenorrhea, take it for two or three days a month, but it is not recommended for severe dysmenorrhea or chronic pelvic pain.

Short-acting contraceptives: a compound medicine made of estrogen and progesterone, which inhibits ovulation and inhibits the endometrial tissue, suitable for mild to moderate pain caused by endometriosis. In severe cases, the effect is not ideal.

 

Mirena: It releases progesterone every day in the uterine cavity. It is especially suitable for adenomyosis. There is no need to think about taking medicine every day, which is very convenient. However, irregular bleeding is prone to occur in the short term, and there are also requirements for the size of the uterine cavity.

(3) Methods suitable for short-term use:

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa) is injected every 28 days to inhibit ovarian function and simulate menopause to achieve the purpose of treatment. The effect is best, but the side effects are also obvious, similar to menopausal syndrome, usually up to 6 months.

 

 

 

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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