January 16, 2022

Medical Trend

Medical News and Medical Resources

Nature: Detection and dissemination kinetics of early Omicron mutants

Where did such "WEIRD" COVID Omicron variant come from?

Nature: Detection and dissemination kinetics of early Omicron mutants



 

Nature: Detection and dissemination kinetics of early Omicron mutants.

 

Recently, Tulio de Oliveira’s team from Terenbosch University in South Africa, who first discovered and reported the COVID-19 Omicron mutant strain, published a research paper in Nature entitled: Rapid epidemic expansion of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant in southern Africa.

 

This peer-reviewed research paper describes the identification and early rapid spread of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) variant Omicron in South Africa..

 

Nature: Detection and dissemination kinetics of early Omicron mutants

 

Austrian McCormick Rong emergence and rapid spread poses a threat to the world, especially in Africa, where fewer than one-tenth of the population had completed the full vaccination.

Tulio de Oliveira’s team analyzed the earliest 686 Omicron genomes (248 from South Africa and 438 from the rest of the world) .

 

They found that between late October and late November 2021, Omicron spread from South Africa’s Gauteng province to seven of South Africa’s eight remaining provinces, as well as two regions in Botswana.

The effective reproduction number is estimated to be about 2.7 in early November to early December — the effective reproduction number is the average number of people an individual can infect in a partially susceptible population at any point in time.

 

As of December 16, 87 countries had detected Omicron in samples of returning travelers from South Africa or in samples routinely tested in the community.

As of early 2022 ,  Omicron has been discovered in more than 100 countries , and the GISAID database has now published more than 100,000 genomes.

The Omicron variant is unique in that it has more than 30 mutations in the viral spike protein.

Genotypic and phenotypic data show that Omicron has the ability to escape neutralizing antibody responses . The simulations described in this paper suggest that immune escape may be a major contributor to Omicron’s observed ability to spread rapidly .

 

 

The authors note that their findings are only based on early sequencing data, and that close monitoring of the spread of Omicron in countries other than South Africa is necessary to better understand the transmissibility of Omicron and its escape from previous infections and the ability of vaccines to induce immunity.

 

 

Reference :
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-03832-5

Nature: Detection and dissemination kinetics of early Omicron mutants

(source:internet, reference only)


Disclaimer of medicaltrend.org