May 27, 2024

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Moderna cooperates to develop non-viral gene therapy

Moderna cooperates to develop non-viral gene therapy



 

Moderna cooperates to develop non-viral gene therapy.


Moderna , which has achieved great commercial success with its mRNA COVID-19 vaccine , will continue to make efforts in 2023 to expand its research and development field beyond mRNA.

Since the beginning of this year, Moderna has successively signed a gene editing cooperation agreement and acquired OriCiro Genomics, a DNA synthesis and amplification technology company.

 

And now, the mRNA giant has once again spent huge sums of money to cooperate with Generation Bio to develop non-viral gene drugs. Moderna will pay $40 million in cash upfront and $36 million in equity investment.

In addition, Moderna will fund all R&D efforts, including research upfront payments from Generation Bio, which will be eligible to receive milestone payments and sales royalties on all therapies, with an expected total amount of up to $1.876 billion, and Moderna will also fund through future equity Financing to acquire the right to purchase additional shares in Generation Bio.

 

Moderna cooperates to develop non-viral gene therapy

 

 

In this collaboration, Moderna has an option to acquire two immune cell programs based on Generation Bio’s cell-targeting lipid nanoparticles (ctLNP) for the delivery of enclosed DNA (ceDNA) .

In addition, Moderna has options for two liver disease programs that will use Generation Bio’s liver-targeting lipid nanoparticles. Finally, Moderna also retains the option for a third immune cell or liver program.

 

Moderna cooperates to develop non-viral gene therapy

 


Longer term, the companies plan to “use collaborative research to continue to advance immune cell targeting in vivo as a new class of genetic medicines,” according to a press release issued by the partners. In addition, Generation Bio will be eligible to receive milestone payments and royalties on sales of any product utilizing its LNP technology.

 

Generation Bio says its closed DNA (ecDNA) has nearly three times the capacity of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) , allowing it to use its cell-targeting lipid nanoparticles (ctLNPs) to carry and deliver larger genes or multiple genes to in cells.

 

Dr. Rose Loughlin , Moderna’s senior vice president of research and early development, said that through this collaboration, on Generation Bio’s non-viral genetic drug platform, we have the potential to target immune cells and liver with different nucleic acid substances to continue gene replacement. Broaden Moderna’s therapeutic pipeline and extend the potential benefits of nucleic acid therapy to more patients.

 

Phillip Samayoa , Ph.D. , Generation Bio’s chief strategy officer , said non-viral DNA therapeutics could provide long-lasting, reusable, titratable genetic medicines to patients with rare and prevalent diseases. This collaboration represents a foundational investment in the science of our platform, both deepening our pipeline of rare disease and prevalent liver disease programs beyond hemophilia A, and accelerating our work in nucleic acid therapeutics beyond the liver .

 

 

 

Generation Bio R&D pipeline

 

Moderna cooperates to develop non-viral gene therapy

 

In recent months, Moderna has been actively exploring a series of gene therapy projects while working on vaccines for COVID-19, other respiratory diseases, and cancer.

Earlier this year, Moderna acquired OriCiro Genomics, a DNA synthesis and amplification technology company, and then partnered with Life Edit Therapeutics to develop next-generation gene-editing therapies for difficult diseases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source :
https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/modernas-genomics-strategy-picks-pace-76m-upfront-generation-bio-collab

Moderna cooperates to develop non-viral gene therapy

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