May 26, 2024

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New medical solution significantly reduces serious consequences of postpartum haemorrhage

New medical solution significantly reduces serious consequences of postpartum haemorrhage



 

E-MOTIVE: New medical solution significantly reduces serious consequences of postpartum haemorrhage.

A new solution called E-MOTIVE could play a role in reducing childbirth-related bleeding deaths, according to a landmark study published May 9 by researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the University of Birmingham. Provides a major breakthrough.

 

New medical solution significantly reduces serious consequences of postpartum haemorrhage

 

Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) — defined as blood loss of more than 500 mL within 24 hours after delivery — is the leading cause of maternal death worldwide. It affects an estimated 14 million women each year and kills around 70,000 people – mostly in low- and middle-income countries – equivalent to one death every six minutes.

 

“Postpartum hemorrhage is horrific, not always predictable, but definitely treatable. However, its impact around the world is tragic,” said WHO Director of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Research, United Nations Human Reproductive Research, Development and Head of the Special Program for Research Training (HRP) Dr Pascal Alotay.

“No woman should fear for her life during childbirth. Effective solutions to address postpartum hemorrhage need to be available and accessible so that all women can experience a safe birth and a healthy future with their families”.

 

The study, involving more than 200,000 women in four countries, found that using a simple, low-cost collection device called a “sling” objectively measures blood loss and bundles WHO-recommended treatments — rather than being offered sequentially — dramatically improved outcomes for women. Severe bleeding – when women lose more than a liter of blood after childbirth – was reduced by 60%, and they were less likely to die.

 

Rates of blood transfusions for bleeding were also drastically reduced, which is especially important in low-income countries where blood is scarce and expensive.

 

 

Professor Arri Coomarasamy, who led the trial and is co-director of the WHO Collaborating Center for Global Women’s Health at the University of Birmingham, said: “This new approach to treating postpartum haemorrhage could fundamentally improve women’s chances of surviving childbirth globally, Get the treatment you need, when you need it.”

Time is of the essence when dealing with postpartum hemorrhage, so interventions that eliminate delays in diagnosis or treatment should be game-changing for maternal health.

 

Currently, a major challenge in tackling PPH is that it is often detected too late for an effective response. Most providers use visual inspection to assess bleeding, which often underestimates blood loss and can lead to life-threatening delays in treatment. When treatment is provided, this is often done in a sequential fashion, with gaps between each intervention – and more time is spent if the first option is not effective.

 

The recommended E-MOTIVE protocol includes early and accurate detection of PPH using a blood collection sling. Where available, this will be supplemented by a point-of-care package including uterine massage , drugs to contract the uterus and stop bleeding, IV fluids, tests and escalation to advanced care if needed.

In the trial, the E-MOTIVE intervention was supported by an implementation strategy, including specific training, PPH carts or suitcases, participation of local advocates, audits and feedback. All components of the E-MOTIVE intervention can be delivered by midwives.

The study echoes one of the top research priorities identified by more than 130 experts from more than 50 countries at the inaugural Global PPH Summit convened by WHO and the Human Resources Program in March this year. The summit marked the start of a global collaborative initiative to substantially reduce the burden of PPH and its consequences in low- and middle-income countries.

The main results of the study were published May 9 in The New England Journal of Medicine. This parallel group randomized trial was a collaboration between the WHO Collaborating Center for Global Women’s Health at the University of Birmingham, UK, and WHO, and was conducted at 80 hospitals in Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa and Tanzania.

 

 

 

 

 

New medical solution significantly reduces serious consequences of postpartum haemorrhage

(source:internet, reference only)


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