July 23, 2024

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Using non-stick cookware may increase the risk of thyroid cancer?

Using non-stick cookware may increase the risk of thyroid cancer?



Using non-stick cookware may increase the risk of thyroid cancer?

PFAS, perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, also known as “forever chemicals,” are commonly used in the production of cosmetics, non-stick cookware, waterproof gear, and firefighting foam due to their unique physical and chemical properties.

PFAS pose a potential threat to human health and the environment. Some studies suggest that exposure to high concentrations of PFAS may have adverse effects on the liver, immune system, and be associated with certain cancers, reproductive issues, and developmental problems.

The incidence of thyroid cancer has significantly increased worldwide in recent decades. Between 1974 and 2013, the average annual increase in thyroid cancer incidence in the United States was 3.6%, and similar growth has been observed in China.

On October 24, 2023, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in the United States published a study titled “Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) exposure and thyroid cancer risk” in the journal “eBioMedicine.”

The study showed that PFAS found in non-stick cookware and cosmetics are associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer. For each quartile increase in the concentration of linear perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (n-PFOS), the diagnosis rate of thyroid cancer increased by 56%.

Using non-stick cookware may increase the risk of thyroid cancer?

In this study, researchers analyzed a biobank (BioMe) at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which included 88 patients with thyroid cancer and 88 non-cancer controls. Plasma samples were collected from these patients before or at the time of diagnosis, and the association between plasma PFAS levels and thyroid cancer diagnosis was analyzed.

Researchers used liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry and suspect screening non-targeted analysis to measure eight plasma PFAS and compared the differences in PFAS levels between participants with thyroid cancer and healthy participants.

The results showed that for each quartile increase in the concentration of linear perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (n-PFOS), the diagnosis rate of thyroid cancer increased by 56%. This positive correlation between n-PFOS and thyroid cancer diagnosis remained consistent after adjusting for all other seven PFAS in a continuous model.

Furthermore, researchers analyzed the plasma PFAS levels of 74 patients with papillary thyroid cancer and found similar results: for each quartile increase in the concentration of linear perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, the diagnosis rate of papillary thyroid cancer increased by 56%.

Researchers also conducted further analysis on 31 patients who had at least one year between joining the cohort and being diagnosed with thyroid cancer, to consider the time interval between exposure to PFAS chemicals and developing the disease.

Further analysis revealed that for each quartile increase in the concentration of linear perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, there was a significant association with thyroid cancer diagnosis, as well as with Sb-PFOS, PFNA, PFOPA, and n-PFHxS.

Researchers stated that the study’s findings further confirm the harm of PFAS to health. Given that it is almost impossible to avoid PFAS in our daily lives, they hope these findings will raise awareness of the seriousness of these persistent chemicals and strive for a day when exposure to PFAS can be avoided.

It is worth mentioning that previously, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Harvard University published a study in the journal “Science of the Total Environment” titled “Exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances and women’s fertility outcomes in a Singaporean population-based preconception cohort.”

The study found that PFAS may reduce women’s fertility by up to 40%, which is related to a decrease in female fertility and fertilization capacity.

Links to the studies:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2023.104831

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2023.162267

Using non-stick cookware may increase the risk of thyroid cancer?


(source:internet, reference only)

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