June 24, 2022

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Abdominal aorta calcification can warn heart disease and stroke

Abdominal aorta calcification can warn heart disease and stroke


Abdominal aorta calcification can warn heart disease and stroke. A new international study shows that abdominal aortic calcification can provide early warning of heart disease and stroke risks.

Abdominal aorta calcification can warn heart disease and stroke

A recent study published by Edith Cowan University in Australia in the Journal of the American Heart Association showed that calcium accumulation in the aorta outside the heart can provide early warning of heart disease and stroke risks, and can help doctors identify cardiovascular disease in the years before symptoms appear. People at risk.

[British “Medical Express” article on January 14, 2021] Title: A new study reveals early warning signs of heart disease.

A recent study published by Edith Cowan University in Australia in the Journal of the American Heart Association showed that calcium accumulation in the aorta outside the heart can provide early warning of heart disease and stroke risks, and can help doctors identify cardiovascular disease in the years before symptoms appear. People at risk.

The research is based on Associate Professor Lewis’ recent research on the use of bone density scans and artificial intelligence to identify and quantify abdominal aortic calcification. Its members are from the European Institute of Business Administration, Sindar and Marcus Institute for Aging, University of Sydney, University of Western Australia and University of Minnesota.

The research team analyzed 52 previous studies and found that people with abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) have a two to four times higher risk of cardiovascular events in the future, and the higher the calcium content in the blood vessel wall, the greater the risk of future cardiovascular events. The greater the risk of vascular events, the risk of people with AAC and chronic kidney disease is higher than the general population with AAC.

Calcium can accumulate in blood vessel walls and harden arteries, block blood supply or cause plaque rupture. This is the main cause of heart attacks and strokes. The factors that cause arterial calcification include poor diet, sedentary, smoking and Genetic.

Predict the “silent killer”

Josh Lewis, principal investigator of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at Edith Cowan University and the future principal investigator of the Heart Foundation, said: “These findings provide important clues to cardiovascular health. Heart disease is usually a “silent killer” because many people treat their own bodies. The situation of the dangerous situation is completely unknown, and no early warning signs of its own (such as abdominal or coronary artery calcification) have been found. The abdominal aorta is one of the earliest parts of the artery where calcium accumulates, even earlier than the heart. If we find it as soon as possible, we can Stop the progression of the disease by changing lifestyle and medication.”

Save lives

Associate Professor Lewis hopes that these findings will enable more people to understand their risk of heart disease or stroke. He said: “In many routine examinations, abdominal aortic calcification is usually unintentionally discovered in routine tests (such as bone densitometers, X-ray scans of the lateral spine), which warns the doctor and prompts the need to investigate and evaluate the patient’s condition. The risk of heart disease or stroke will deepen the understanding of the prognosis of these patients. The sooner this abnormality is detected, the sooner you can change your lifestyle and start preventive treatment, which may save countless lives in the future.”

Bright future

Amanda Buttery, Clinical Evidence Manager of the Heart Foundation, said that evidence of abdominal aortic calcification in patients without known cardiovascular disease suggests that a more comprehensive cardiovascular risk assessment may be required, including blood pressure and cholesterol tests or heart health checks. These findings are promising, and the Heart Foundation hopes to see more research in this area.

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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