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Do antihypertensive drugs cause cancer?

Can antihypertensive drugs cause cancer?

 

Can antihypertensive drugs cause cancer? In fact, people often ask doctors whether antihypertensive drugs cause cancer.

 

The medical community agrees that the current evidence is not enough to support the view that antihypertensive drugs can cause cancer, and everyone can take it with confidence.

 

In fact, people often ask doctors whether antihypertensive drugs cause cancer.

 

A lot of Internet information mentions articles on public diseases and health. Because of the professional issues involved, ordinary people cannot distinguish whether these articles are objective and credible. Moreover, this kind of articles has a wider scope because of the topic of eyeball The spread of.

 

If hypertensive patients, especially some elderly patients, listen to this information and stop or change their medications, what will be the consequences? Is it a stroke, hemiplegia, kidney failure, or myocardial infarction?

 


Where did the claim that “hypertensive drugs cause cancer” come from?

 

In recent years, there have been some clinical studies and meta-analysis successively, reporting that antihypertensive drugs have increased the risk of cancer. In 2001, a review (meta-analysis) by scholars of Birmingham City University in the United Kingdom on antihypertensive treatment and cancer risk. The results of this study indicate that diuretics may be related to the occurrence of renal cell carcinoma; dipines, pristines and β-blockers have no effect on the occurrence of cancer. A meta-analysis published in The Lancet Oncology Journal in 2010 pushed this question to the forefront. The study suggested that sartans (ARB) increase the risk of new cancers and the risk of new lung cancer.

This result caused a lot of panic in the medical profession and patients. As we all know, Pristine and Sartan drugs are the basic treatment drugs for patients with hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Say they are carcinogenic, is it to eat or not to eat?


Soon, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety announcement regarding sartans and cancer. In response to this article in The Lancet Oncology Journal. The FDA announcement clearly states: Sartans (ARB) will not increase the risk of cancer.

 

So, why does the article in a big-name magazine like The Lancet Tumor and the FDA announcement have diametrically opposite conclusions?

 

This is the problem of “bias” in clinical research. Clinical research cannot achieve complete baseline consistency, consistent intervention conditions, and consistent environment as in animal experiments. When analyzing results, although confounding factors will be corrected as much as possible, results may still be offset.


Coincidentally, in 2018, the British Medical Journal (BMJ) published a meta-analysis that included 990,000 observation subjects over 20 years, and the results showed that the application of pristine (ACEI) is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. Once this study was released, many scholars questioned it, including serious baseline imbalances between groups, non-continuous follow-up smoking status, uncorrected residual confounding factors, insufficient statistical power, and unsupported external data.


At the same time, there are many high-quality studies, and the results show the safety of antihypertensive drugs.

 

In 2015, a large-sample database study in Taiwan of some countries showed that long-term use of antihypertensive drugs will not increase the risk of prostate cancer.

 

In 2016, a prospective cohort study conducted in the United States and Puerto Rico. The results show that long-term use of calcium channel blockers (dipine) and other types of antihypertensive drugs in female hypertensive patients with a family history of breast cancer will not increase the risk of breast cancer.

In 2019, a national cohort study conducted in Denmark explored the relationship between antihypertensive drugs and the risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The results showed that the application of antihypertensive drugs did not increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis.


Pristine and sartans can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular death, so you should follow the guidelines and insist on taking them.


A large amount of evidence-based medical evidence shows that for patients with hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and chronic kidney disease, pristine and sartan drugs can effectively lower blood pressure, can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular and renal adverse events, and improve life Quality and extend the life of patients. A number of real-world studies have shown that long-term adherence to the treatment of ACEI and ARB determines the risk of adverse cardiovascular events and all-cause death in patients to a large extent. Therefore, all guidelines for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases recommend these two categories as basic treatment drugs.

 

Therefore, before more convincing evidence appears, it is recommended to continue to choose antihypertensive drugs according to current guidelines. At the same time, there is no need to worry about cancer risk.

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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