September 25, 2022

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Benign breast tumors: Peripheral breast intraductal papilloma

Benign breast tumors: Peripheral breast intraductal papilloma


Benign breast tumors: Peripheral breast intraductal papilloma.  Papilloma may contain abnormal-looking cells, similar to atypical ductal hyperplasia (with a moderately increased risk of breast cancer) or even low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ.

Benign breast tumors: Peripheral breast intraductal papilloma

Intraductal papilloma of the breast is a benign tumor that develops in the breast duct. Peripheral breast intraductal papillomas. They do not grow under the nipple, but in the distant ducts. These ducts are located at the far end of the breast structure, closer to the milk-producing lobules.

 

Other common differences compared to central intraductal papilloma of the breast are:

Multiple papillomas of the breast are more common in peripheral breast papillomas, and they can appear in both breasts (bilateral).

Peripheral breast papilloma tends to be smaller in size than central papilloma, and there is generally less or no discharge.

They often affect young premenopausal women.

Peripheral breast papilloma appears to slightly increase the risk of breast cancer. In some cases, breast cancer cells are actually found to be close to peripheral papilloma. The attending doctor will completely remove all papillomas and include their catheters. The pathologist (the doctor who examines the cells) then examines the tissue to make sure that everything is ok.

Sometimes a papilloma may contain cells that look abnormal, similar to atypical ductal hyperplasia (with a moderately increased risk of breast cancer) or even low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ.

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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