July 1, 2022

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Benign breast disease in women: central ductal papilloma

Benign breast disease in women: central ductal papilloma



 

Benign breast disease in women: central ductal papilloma. 

Central papilloma rarely contains abnormal cells, similar to atypical ductal hyperplasia (its risk of breast cancer is moderately increased) or even low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ.

 

Intraductal papilloma is a benign tumor that grows in the ducts of the breast.

Central intraductal papilloma develops in the large duct below the nipple, usually as a single growth, although there may be many, central papilloma with normal appearance cells (without atypical) does not increase the risk of future breast cancer risk.

 

Benign breast disease in women: central ductal papilloma

 

Papilloma is usually a small brownish-pink growth, usually less than 1 centimeter (cm), although it can grow to 5 or 6 cm.

It usually occurs in women between 30 and 50 years old.

Sometimes it will be found in a mammogram. It may also be diagnosed after you develop symptoms such as lumps or abnormal nipple discharge.

Under the microscope, the papilloma appears to be composed of finger-like protrusions.

 

The attending doctor will perform minor surgery to remove the papilloma itself or the catheter with the papilloma inside.

Usually a small incision can be made along the rounded edge of the areola (the deeper skin around the nipple).

Then, the pathologist (the doctor who checks the cell sample) can examine the papilloma to make sure that all cells are normal, thus confirming that you are not increasing your risk of breast cancer.

 

Central papilloma rarely contains abnormal cells, similar to atypical ductal hyperplasia (its risk of breast cancer is moderately increased) or even low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ.

 

 

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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