November 27, 2022

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Nature Medicine: Is Pfizer mRNA COVID-19 vaccine effective?

Nature Medicine: Is Pfizer mRNA COVID-19 vaccine effective?

 

Nature Medicine: Is Pfizer mRNA COVID-19 vaccine effective? The top international journal Nature Medicine published two consecutive articles on the effectiveness of Pfizer’s mRNA vaccine.

Nature Medicine: Is Pfizer mRNA COVID-19 vaccine effective?

Nature Medicine: Is Pfizer mRNA COVID-19 vaccine effective?

 

The experimental results show:

1. In addition to protecting the vaccinators, the Pfizer mRNA vaccine can also effectively reduce the viral load in the infection center of the new coronavirus outbreak and further inhibit the re-spread of the virus.

2. Among those vaccinated with Pfizer’s BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine, a single dose of the vaccine is sufficient for individuals with a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

 

Pfizer mRNA vaccine can effectively reduce the viral load of COVID-19-positive patients

When the researchers analyzed the data set that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 after vaccination with Pfizer’s BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine, they found that infections that occurred 12-37 days after the first vaccination had a significant reduction in viral load. Compared with those who have not been vaccinated, these reductions in viral load imply that vaccine-injectors will only have lower infectivity even after being infected with the new coronavirus, which further illustrates the impact of the vaccine on the spread of the virus. Recent data indicate that the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine can effectively prevent diseases from 7 days after the second vaccination and provide some early protection from 12 days after the first vaccination.

Researchers collected and analyzed data from a total of 4,938 vaccinators in Israel’s MHS Central Laboratory from December 21, 2020 to February 11, 2021. The positive rate of COVID-19 is high and stable, indicating that the disease is developing during this time period. popular. Through the analysis of the fluorescence threshold (Ct) of the infection cycle over time, the researchers found that the average viral load dropped significantly 12 days after the first dose of the vaccine. This is in line with the known early stage of vaccine-mediated protection. Consistent. Considering that the viral load may be related to age and gender, the researchers set up a positive test control group with matching age, gender, and sampling date range among unvaccinated patients. The results show that the data on days 1-11 are comparable and there is no difference. However, within 12-37 days after vaccination, the viral load of the vaccinated individual was reduced by approximately 2.8-4.5 times.

 

Pfizer mRNA vaccine “one shot is also effective?”

Pfizer’s BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine has brought great hope to people for suppressing the infection and spread of COVID-19. But the challenges facing the supply chain have prompted people to question whether single-dose vaccination can meet the needs of certain individuals, especially those who have recovered from previous infections.

With this question in mind, the researchers recruited medical staff from a large academic medical center in Southern California. By comparing the vaccination response of previously diagnosed and non-infected persons, the researchers assessed the SARS- after the first and second injections of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. The CoV-2 specific antibody and virus-specific T cell response concluded that the previously diagnosed infection has naturally acquired immunity, and a single dose of vaccination can fully enhance its immunity.

The researchers found that for IgG (N) (representing response to previous infection) and IgG (S-RBD) (representing response to previous infection or vaccine), individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 had at all time points Higher antibody levels. In addition, there was no significant difference in IgG (S-RBD) levels between previously infected individuals after a single dose and uninfected individuals who received two doses.

Furthermore, the researchers further evaluated the ability to induce neutralizing antibodies through the high-throughput ACE2 inhibitor neutralization substitute test and found that the second dose of the vaccine did not provide a previously infected individual with a greater antibody neutralization titer than a single dose of the vaccine. A single dose of the vaccine is sufficient for individuals with a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection. This high potential is not only reflected in the level of anti-S antibodies, but also in the results of the ACE2 inhibition test.

It is not difficult to see that the above results provide preliminary evidence for the formulation of public health programs and immunization strategies: individuals with a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection can provide single-dose vaccines and timely and complete vaccine injection methods for uninfected individuals. Improve the effectiveness of limited vaccine supply.

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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