August 16, 2022

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People who get flu vaccine are 40% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease

People who get flu vaccine are 40% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease



 

People who get flu vaccine are 40% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

According to a new 4-year-old study by the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston: Compared to people who had never had the flu vaccine, those who were vaccinated at least once were 40% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

 

People who get flu vaccine are 40% less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease

 

The researchers compared the risk of Alzheimer’s disease between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients in a large sample of U.S. adults 65 and older.

The study was led by first author Avram S. Bukhbinder, MD, a new alumnus of the McGovern School of Medicine at FEH, and senior author of the paper Paul. E. Schulz, MD, McGovern Rick McCord Professor of Neurology, School of Medicine.

 

“We found that influenza vaccination in older adults reduced the risk of Alzheimer’s disease over several years,” Bukhbinder said. “The strength of this protective effect increased with the number of years a person was vaccinated against influenza per year — in other words, Those who adhered to the annual flu vaccine had the lowest rates of Alzheimer’s disease. Future research should assess whether flu vaccination is also associated with the rate of symptom progression in patients already with Alzheimer’s dementia.”

 

Two years ago, researchers from UTHealth Houston found a possible link between the flu shot and a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease, but the sample analyzed this time was much larger than previous studies and included 935,887 flu-vaccinated patients and 935,887 unvaccinated patients.

 

During four years of follow-up, about 5.1 percent of flu vaccine recipients were found to have Alzheimer’s disease.

Meanwhile, 8.5 percent of the unvaccinated patients developed Alzheimer’s disease during the follow-up period.

These results underscore the powerful protective effect of the flu vaccine against Alzheimer’s disease, Bukhbinder and Schulz said. However, the underlying mechanism behind this process requires further study.

 

“Since there is evidence that several vaccines can protect against Alzheimer’s disease, we don’t think this is a specific effect of the flu vaccine,” Schulz said. “Instead, we believe that the immune system is complex and that some changes, such as pneumonia, may act in a way that causes The way Alzheimer’s gets worse activates it. But other things that activate the immune system may do it in a different way — a way to protect Alzheimer’s. Obviously, there’s a lot to be said about how the immune system gets worse or improves the disease As a result, we have more to learn.”

 

 

 

 

People who get flu vaccine are 40% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease

(source:internet, reference only)


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