May 30, 2024

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Being hard to fall asleep could increase stroke risks

Being hard to fall asleep could increase stroke risks



 

Being hard to fall asleep could increase stroke risks. 

 

People under the age of 50 are at higher risk, new research suggests.

A recent study published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, suggests that people who exhibit symptoms related to insomnia, such as difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early, may be at higher risk of stroke.

The researchers also found a significantly higher risk for those under the age of 50. It’s worth noting, however, that the study did not prove a causal link between insomnia symptoms and stroke, but instead highlighted a correlation between the two.

 

 

Being hard to fall asleep could increase stroke risks

 

“There are many therapies that can help people improve their sleep quality, so identifying which sleep problems lead to an increased risk of stroke may facilitate early treatment or behavioral therapy for people with sleep difficulties and may reduce stroke risk.” Study author, Richmond Wendemi Sawadogo, MD, MPH, Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University, FAPN.

 

The study involved 31,126 people with an average age of 61 years. Participants had no history of stroke at the start of the study.

 

Participants were asked four questions about difficulty falling asleep, waking up during the night, waking up too early and not being able to go back to sleep, and how often they felt rested in the morning. Response options include “most of the time,” “sometimes,” or “rarely or never.” Scores ranged from zero to eight, with higher numbers meaning more severe symptoms, and the men were followed for an average of nine years. A total of 2101 strokes occurred during this period.

 

After adjusting for other factors that may affect stroke risk, including alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity levels, the researchers found that people with one to four symptoms had a 16 percent increased risk of stroke compared with those without symptoms. Of the 19,149 people with one to four symptoms, 1,300 had a stroke. Of the 6,282 asymptomatic people, 365 had a stroke.

Those with five to eight symptoms of insomnia had a 51 percent increased risk. Of 5,695 people with five to eight symptoms, 436 had a stroke.

 

The link between insomnia symptoms and stroke was stronger among participants under the age of 50, with those with five to eight symptoms having almost four times the risk of stroke compared with those without symptoms. Of 458 people under the age of 50 with five to eight symptoms, 27 had a stroke.

Compared with people without symptoms, people aged 50 or older with the same symptoms had a 38 percent increased risk of stroke. Of 654 people aged 50 and over with five to eight symptoms, 33 had a stroke.

 

“The difference in risk between the two age groups may be due to a higher incidence of stroke at older ages,” added Sawadogo. As people age, stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes increase. The number may increase, making insomnia symptoms one of many possible factors. This significant difference suggests that controlling insomnia symptoms at a young age may be an effective strategy for preventing stroke. Future research should explore the reduction of stroke by managing sleep problems risk.”

 

The association was further strengthened for people with diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and depression.

 

 

 

 

Being hard to fall asleep could increase stroke risks

(source:internet, reference only)


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