August 16, 2022

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Universal influenza vaccine: Human clinical trials have been carried out

Universal influenza vaccine: Human clinical trials have been carried out



 

Universal influenza vaccine: Human clinical trials have been carried out.

Worldwide, seasonal influenza kills as many as 650,000 people each year, and because the flu virus mutates so rapidly, a new vaccine must be developed each year, making long-term infection prevention difficult.
In addition, these annual vaccines only protect against circulating strains of the human flu virus, not against other strains that may arise from animals.

On July 13, 2022, researchers from the National Institutes of Health ( NIH) published a research paper titled: An inactivated multivalent influenza A virus vaccine is broadly protective in mice and ferrets in Science Translational Medicine .

 

The study developed a universal influenza vaccine consisting of inactivated whole-virus avian influenza subtype A influenza vaccine, which constitutes the majority of current influenza cases.

The vaccine consists of the H1N9, H3N8, H5N1 and H7N3 subtypes, and also includes multiple viral proteins that elicit broad protective B- and T-cell responses.

 

The vaccine has been shown to protect animal model mice and ferrets against a variety of influenza A viruses , including the 1918 H1N1 strain, the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 strain and H7N9, as well as other strains from humans, avian and swine of potentially lethal influenza strains.

Currently, the vaccine has been approved by the FDA and is undergoing human clinical trials.

 

 Original biological world biological world 2022-07-13 21:13 Posted onShanghai Image Image Written by Wang Cong Editor丨Wang Duoyu Typesetting丨Shuichengwen  Worldwide, seasonal influenza kills as many as 650,000 people each year, and because the flu virus mutates so rapidly, a new vaccine must be developed each year, making long-term infection prevention difficult. In addition, these annual vaccines only protect against circulating strains of the human flu virus, not against other strains that may arise from animals.  On July 13, 2022, researchers from the National Institutes of Health ( NIH) published a research paper titled: An inactivated multivalent influenza A virus vaccine is broadly protective in mice and ferrets in Science Translational Medicine .  The study developed a universal influenza vaccine consisting of inactivated whole-virus avian influenza subtype A influenza vaccine, which constitutes the majority of current influenza cases. The vaccine consists of the H1N9, H3N8, H5N1 and H7N3 subtypes, and also includes multiple viral proteins that elicit broad protective B- and T-cell responses.  The vaccine has been shown to protect animal model mice and ferrets against a variety of influenza A viruses , including the 1918 H1N1 strain, the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 strain and H7N9, as well as other strains from humans, avian and swine of potentially lethal influenza strains. Currently, the vaccine has been approved by the FDA and is undergoing human clinical trials.  Image  The vaccine, which can be administered by injection or intranasally, protects mice and ferrets against a variety of human, swine and avian influenza strains. Vaccinated animals exhibited significant reductions in viral titers, lung pathology, and host inflammatory responses compared to control animals.  The way the vaccine is made is similar to how seasonal flu vaccines are currently produced, meaning it could be relatively simple and inexpensive to make this universal vaccine candidate. In addition, no toxicity was observed in mice, ferrets or rabbits that received the vaccine, suggesting that the vaccine candidate may be safe in humans, subject to further validation in clinical trials.  At present, the universal influenza vaccine has been approved by the FDA for human clinical trials, and a phase 1 clinical trial aimed at verifying safety and immunogenicity was launched at the NIH Clinical Center in June this year.  For years, researchers around the world have been trying to develop a universal flu vaccine that would save scientists and pharmaceutical companies from predicting circulating strains and redesigning the vaccine each year.  The new vaccine candidate could be widely used as a pre-epidemic flu vaccine and a super-seasonal flu vaccine, and the vaccine is inexpensive and easy to distribute globally, according to the authors of the paper.  Paper link : https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/scitranslmed.abo2167

 

 

The vaccine, which can be administered by injection or intranasally, protects mice and ferrets against a variety of human, swine and avian influenza strains.

Vaccinated animals exhibited significant reductions in viral titers, lung pathology, and host inflammatory responses compared to control animals.

 

The way the vaccine is made is similar to how seasonal flu vaccines are currently produced, meaning it could be relatively simple and inexpensive to make this universal vaccine candidate.

In addition, no toxicity was observed in mice, ferrets or rabbits that received the vaccine, suggesting that the vaccine candidate may be safe in humans, subject to further validation in clinical trials.

 

At present, the universal influenza vaccine has been approved by the FDA for human clinical trials, and a phase 1 clinical trial aimed at verifying safety and immunogenicity was launched at the NIH Clinical Center in June this year.

 

For years, researchers around the world have been trying to develop a universal flu vaccine that would save scientists and pharmaceutical companies from predicting circulating strains and redesigning the vaccine each year.

 

The new vaccine candidate could be widely used as a pre-epidemic flu vaccine and a super-seasonal flu vaccine, and the vaccine is inexpensive and easy to distribute globally, according to the authors of the paper.

 

 

 

 

Paper link :
https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/scitranslmed.abo2167

Universal influenza vaccine: Human clinical trials have been carried out.

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