May 21, 2024

Medical Trend

Medical News and Medical Resources

Brain-Eating Amoeba Emerging in U.S. with These Symptoms

Brain-Eating Amoeba Emerging in U.S. with These Symptoms



 

Brain-Eating Amoeba Emerging in U.S. with These Symptoms.

What is the “Brain-Eating Amoeba”? Cases Emerging in the United States with These Symptoms…

Recent occurrences of “Naegleria fowleri amoeba,” commonly referred to as the “brain-eating amoeba,” have led to fatal cases of amoebic meningoencephalitis, sparking concerns.

In the state of Georgia, USA, at the end of last month, a case emerged where a resident suspectedly contracted the “brain-eating amoeba” while swimming in freshwater lakes or ponds, resulting in death.

 

Brain-Eating Amoeba Emerging in U.S. with These Symptoms

Brain-eating amoeba Picture: US CDC

 

 

According to statistics from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), out of 154 infection cases reported in the United States from 1962 to 2021, only 4 individuals survived.

 

As reported by CNN, the Georgia Department of Public Health had stated in July that a Georgia resident, possibly infected while swimming in freshwater lakes or ponds, died from a rare infection caused by the Naegleria fowleri amoeba.

 

The US health authorities stated in a press conference, “A Georgia resident has died from an infection with Naegleria fowleri amoeba, a rare infection that destroys brain tissue, causes brain swelling, and usually leads to death. This person likely became infected while swimming in freshwater lakes or ponds in Georgia.”

 

Naegleria fowleri is a type of amoeba that thrives in soil and warm freshwater environments like lakes, rivers, ponds, and hot springs.

 

The report mentioned that this substance has not been found in saline water, properly treated drinking water, or swimming pools.

 

The report further stated, “Prior to this recent case of Naegleria fowleri infection, Georgia had reported 5 other cases since 1962.”

 

According to data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only 4 out of 154 individuals in the United States survived amoebic meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri infection from 1962 to 2021.

 

Earlier this month, the Nevada Department of Health and Behavioral Services announced that a 2-year-old boy died from Naegleria fowleri infection, likely contracted from a natural hot spring.

 

Additionally, in February of this year, officials in Florida stated that a resident died from Naegleria fowleri amoeba infection after using tap water to rinse their sinuses.

 

Symptoms of Naegleria fowleri infection include severe headaches, fever, nausea, and vomiting initially, followed by stiff neck, seizures, hallucinations, and coma.

This infection requires combination therapy, including antibiotics like amphotericin B, antifungal medication like fluconazole, antibacterial drugs like rifampin, and the corticosteroid dexamethasone.

 

 

 

 

(source:internet, reference only)


Disclaimer of medicaltrend.org


Important Note: The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as medical advice.