September 28, 2022

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Be careful: The fatality rate of a rare insect virus in North America is 97%

Be careful: The fatality rate of a rare insect virus in North America is 97%



 

Be careful: The fatality rate of a rare insect virus in North America is 97%.  154 people infected with this virus outdoors , only 4 survive.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed that a brain-eating amoeba has killed a Nebraska child who was swimming in the Elkhorn River.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Saturday that a child was infected with the extremely rare amoeba, which eventually killed 97 percent of those infected.

 

Officials did not release the names of the victims, and the death was the first recorded human death from a brain-eating amoeba in Nebraska.

“Naegleria Fowleri is an amoeba commonly found in warm freshwater lakes, rivers, canals and ponds across North America, ” the department said in a release .

 

Be careful: The fatality rate of a rare insect virus in North America is 97%

 

It can cause primary amebic meningitis (PAM), a virus that develops and causes a brain infection when water containing amoeba is flushed into the nose and reaches the brain. This infection is extremely rare, but almost always fatal.”

 

Cases of the brain-eating amoeba have historically not been limited to Nebraska, and can travel anywhere with bodies of water, CDC epidemiologists say.

 

Brain-eating amoebas are rare in the United States and Canada. In the past year, CDCs in the U.S. and Canada have recorded 41 infections. Although rare, after exposure to a brain-eating amoeba and infection, patients have a slim chance of survival.

 

The fatality rate for contracting the virus is 97 percent, according to the CDC, and only four of the 154 recorded cases survived.

 

e death confirmed Saturday is the second fatality of a brain-eating amoeba in the United States this year. A Missouri resident became infected and died in March after swimming in Lake Three Fires in Iowa.

 

The CDC warns to avoid soaking your nose and mouth in natural bodies of water, and wearing a nose clip while in water can help prevent such infections.

According to the WHO, the amoeba, known as Neglia flexneri, travels down the nose and into the brain, causing severe brain damage. Most patients infected with Negriamoeba die within a week.

Naegleria fowleri (scientific name: Naegleria fowleri) is a Negri worm of the class Heterolobosea, commonly known as brain-eating bacteria, brain-eating amoeba, and amoeba fowleri.

 

 

Millions of people are exposed to the amoeba each year, but only a very small number become infected. Health officials don’t know why some people get Negriamoeba infection and others don’t.

There are three forms in its biological life cycle: cystic, amoeba-like and flagellate forms. When the environment is suitable for it to survive, Negri flexneri exists in the form of an amoeba that ambles through soil or water in search of bacteria for food.

 

When the environment is not good, Naglia flexneri will grow flagella and become the type of flagellates to find a more suitable place to live. When the environment is extremely harsh, it will become a cyst to survive the hard times.

 

 

Be careful: The fatality rate of a rare insect virus in North America is 97%

(source:internet, reference only)


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