June 16, 2024

Medical Trend

Medical News and Medical Resources

New-Onset Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases After COVID-19 infection

New-Onset Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases After COVID-19 infection



 

New-Onset Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases After COVID-19 infection.

On Oct 9,  in the JAMA Network Open, South Korean researchers have discovered a significant increase in the risk of various new-onset autoimmune and inflammatory connective tissue diseases after COVID-19 infection, some of which are associated with disease severity. However, vaccination has been found to reduce these risks.

In a retrospective study, researchers analyzed national data from the South Korean Disease Prevention Agency and the National Health Insurance Corporation regarding COVID-19 patients from October 2020 to December 2021. The control group consisted of individuals identified as uninfected by the National Health Insurance Corporation.

The average age of the 354,527 COVID-19 patients was 52.2 years, with 50.5% being female. In the control group of 6,134,940 individuals, the average age was 52.1 years, with 50.1% being female. The average follow-up time for the COVID-19 group and the control group was 120 days and 121 days, respectively.

“The potential association between COVID-19 and autoimmune diseases…some have suggested that SARS-CoV-2 seems to disrupt self-tolerance and trigger autoimmune reactions that may lead to the development of autoimmune diseases,” wrote the study authors.

 

 

New-Onset Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases After COVID-19 infection

 

 


▊ Participants Vaccinated with Lower Risk

Compared to the control group, COVID-19 patients had a significantly higher risk of developing alopecia areata (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.12), total alopecia (aHR, 1.74), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (aHR, 2.76), Crohn’s disease (aHR, 1.68), and sarcoidosis (aHR, 1.59).

These research findings suggest that autoimmune and inflammatory connective tissue diseases may manifest as long-term sequelae of COVID-19, highlighting potential long-term health consequences associated with COVID-19.

The risk of developing conditions such as alopecia areata, psoriasis, vitiligo, vasculitis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, adult-onset Still’s disease, Sjögren’s syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, and sarcoidosis was found to be associated with the severity of COVID-19.

In subgroup analyses, unvaccinated participants had a higher risk of autoimmune diseases (such as alopecia areata, total alopecia, and Crohn’s disease) and COVID-related cardiovascular outcomes. However, in vaccinated participants, the risk of autoimmune and cardiovascular outcomes was lower. In the COVID-19 subgroup consisting of males and those with severe COVID-19, the risk of psoriasis was slightly elevated.

The researchers concluded, “These study results suggest that autoimmune and inflammatory connective tissue diseases may manifest as long-term sequelae of COVID-19, emphasizing the potential long-term health consequences associated with COVID-19.”

 

 

 

 

New-Onset Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases After COVID-19 infection

(source:internet, reference only)


Disclaimer of medicaltrend.org


Important Note: The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as medical advice.