June 27, 2022

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The embryo develops slowly after test tube transfer?

The embryo develops slowly after test tube transfer?

 

The embryo develops slowly after test tube transfer, or even the fetus stops. Three high-risk factors should be avoided.

The embryo develops slowly after test tube transfer?


The embryo develops slowly or stops growing directly after implantation. What is the cause of this phenomenon?

Everyone knows that after embryo transfer and implantation, the fetal sac, fetal bud and fetal heart can usually be seen within 28 days. However, in clinical practice, I have also encountered many patients 11 or 13 days after the embryo transfer, the HCG in the blood showed pregnancy, but a few days later showed that the value did not rise well or stopped rising, and some showed a decline, which means The embryo develops slowly or stops growing directly after implantation. What is the cause of this phenomenon?

 

1. The problem of embryo quality

After the embryo develops slowly or stops developing after implantation, we must first consider the quality of the embryo itself. If the quality of the embryo is not good, its developmental potential is not enough. The embryo will stop growing after a period of growth, and the HCG value in the mother’s blood will decrease.

 

2. Female endometrium and blood supply problems

The endometrial environment of some women is not ideal, and the blood supply to the uterus is insufficient, which cannot provide an ideal growth environment for the subsequent growth and development of the embryo. This will also cause the embryo to develop slowly, and even fetal arrest will occur after a period of time.

 

3. Biochemical pregnancy

In addition, IVF and normal pregnancy are the same. Natural pregnancy may cause fetal growth to stop, or biochemical pregnancy may occur. The so-called biochemical pregnancy means that after the embryo transfer, HCG has risen very well in the initial stage, but it has not continued to rise, and there is no fetal sac, fetal heart, and fetal bud. In the process of IVF, the quality of the embryo itself, the environment of the uterus, the secretion of progesterone and other factors can trigger a “biochemical pregnancy”, and sometimes embryonic chromosomal problems can also cause the embryo to stop growing after a period of time.

 

In order to avoid this situation, we generally recommend that patients transplant good quality embryos, thoroughly check the uterine environment before implantation, and use progesterone and other drugs to protect the pregnancy after implantation. If you encounter an unavoidable “biochemical” pregnancy, it is recommended that test tube women consult a doctor in time to determine a response plan in time.

(source:internet, reference only)


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