August 19, 2022

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A large-scale study confirmed that eating meat often is related to many diseases!

A large-scale study confirmed that eating meat often is related to many diseases!

 

A large-scale study confirmed that eating meat often is related to many diseases! BMC Medicine:  A large-scale study confirmed that regular meat eating is related to many common diseases! How much meat is appropriate? See what the experts say!

Researchers from the University of Oxford have shown through a large-scale study. Regular meat consumption is related to a series of diseases.

The association of some of these diseases is confirmed for the first time. The results of the study link regular meat consumption with a high risk of a variety of diseases, including heart disease, pneumonia, and diabetes, and a low risk of iron deficiency anemia.

This study was recently published in the journal BMC Medicine under the title Meat consumption and risk of 25 common conditions: outcome-wide analyses in 475,000 men and women in the UK Biobank study.

 

A large-scale study confirmed that eating meat often is related to many diseases!

There is currently consistent evidence that excessive consumption of red meat and processed meats (such as bacon and sausage) may be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. But so far, it is unclear whether high meat intake will increase or decrease the risk of other non-cancer diseases.

The researchers investigated this in a new large cohort study that used data from nearly 475,000 British adults to monitor 25 major reasons for their non-cancer hospitalizations. Participants were included in the UK biobank study from 2006 to 2010, and were followed up to 2017, with an average follow-up survey time of 8 years. At the beginning of the study, participants filled out a questionnaire to assess their eating habits (including meat intake), and then were divided into several groups based on their meat intake: 0-1 times a week, 2 times a week, 3-4 times a week, and 5 times a week or more. The researchers also correlated each participant’s meat intake information with hospitalizations and deaths from the NHS Central Register.

In general, participants who ate unprocessed red meat and processed meat more than three times a week were more likely to smoke, drink, be overweight or obese, and eat less fruits, vegetables, and fish than low-meat eaters. After considering these factors, the results show that:

Large consumption of unprocessed red meat and processed meat is associated with a higher risk of ischemic heart disease, pneumonia, diverticulosis, colon polyps, and diabetes. For example, every extra 70 grams of red meat and processed meat consumed daily increases the risk of ischemic heart disease by 15% and the risk of diabetes by 30%.

Higher intake of poultry meat is associated with a higher risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastritis and duodenitis, diverticulosis, gallbladder disease and diabetes. Every extra 30 grams of poultry meat consumed daily increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease by 17% and the risk of diabetes by 14%.
If you consider the body mass index (BMI), most of these positive correlations are reduced. This suggests that the higher average weight of meat-eating people may be part of the reason for these associations.
The research team also found that high intake of unprocessed red meat and poultry meat is associated with a lower risk of iron deficiency anemia. A daily intake of 50 grams of unprocessed red meat reduces the risk of disease by 20%; an additional 30 grams of poultry meat a day reduces the risk of disease by 17%. Higher processed meat intake is not associated with the risk of iron deficiency anemia.

The research team said that unprocessed red meat and processed meat may increase the risk of ischemic heart disease because they are the main dietary source of saturated fatty acids. They increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, which is a recognized risk factor for ischemic heart disease.

The lead author of this article, Dr. Keren Papier from the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford, said: “We have long known that the consumption of unprocessed red meat and processed meat can cause cancer, and this work is the first to evaluate in a study. 25 non-cancer health problems are associated with meat intake.”

Dr. Papier said that further research is needed to assess whether the differences in risk associated with meat intake that they observe reflect causality. If it is causal, these diseases can be prevented to some extent by reducing meat consumption. However, the results associated with eating meat and a lower risk of iron deficiency anemia indicate that people who do not eat meat should pay attention to obtaining sufficient iron through diet or supplements.

The World Cancer Research Fund recommends that people should limit their intake of red meat to no more than three servings per week (that is, the total weight of cooked meat is about 350-500 grams), if you want to eat processed meat You should also eat as little as possible.

(source:internet, reference only)


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