September 25, 2022

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Cardiovascular disease: Eating Fish reduces recurrence and death 15%

Cardiovascular disease: Eating Fish reduces recurrence and death 15%

 

Cardiovascular disease: Eating Fish reduces recurrence and death 15%.  Eating more of these fish can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease recurrence and death by more than 15%.

Cardiovascular disease: Eating Fish reduces recurrence and death 15%
It is universally recognized that eating more fish is good for health. As the saying goes, those who eat four legs are not as good as those who eat two legs, and those who eat two legs are not as good as those without legs. The so-called “legs” is fish.

In 2021, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association-Internal Medicine showed that frequent consumption of oily fish and patients with cardiovascular diseases caused major cardiovascular events (including myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure) and death Risk reduction is related.

In fact, it is universally recognized that eating more fish is good for health. As the saying goes, those who eat four legs are not as good as those who eat two legs, and those who eat two legs are not as good as those without legs. The so-called “legs” is fish.

 

Eat more deep-sea fish, Help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease recurrence and death

Researchers collected information on age, gender, education level, height, weight, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, etc. of 191,558 subjects from 58 countries on 6 continents, as well as the consumption and consumption of different fish in daily life Information such as frequency was subsequently analyzed, and the average follow-up time was 9 years. In addition, the researchers also counted the occurrence of major cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure and sudden death during the follow-up period.

After adjusting for other influencing factors, the researchers found that among subjects with a history of cardiovascular disease, eating at least 175g of “oily fish” per week was associated with recurrence of cardiovascular disease events and a reduced risk of death.

“Oily fish” refers to fish with a high content of omega-3 fatty acids (especially DHA and EPA), also known as deep-sea fish, such as:

  • Eel
  • Snake mackerel
  • Atlantic herring
  • Sprats
  • Tuna (bluefin and albacore tuna)
  • Salmon
  • Mackerel
  • Catfish
  • Sardine
  • Salmon
  • Whitebait
  • Herring etc.


Among the participants with a history of cardiovascular disease, compared with those who did not or rarely consume oily fish (≤50g/week), consuming at least 175g of oily fish per week was associated with a lower risk of major cardiovascular disease events 16% is associated with an 18% reduction in the risk of death.

When the consumption of oily fish is 350g/week or more, the related risks are not further reduced. This means that eating oily fish beyond a certain amount does not bring additional benefits. For other fish, no association was found with the reduction of related risks.

Researchers analyzed that oily fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, as well as other nutrients, such as vitamin D, riboflavin, iodine, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and iron. These nutrients may affect the cardiovascular system. Health is beneficial, reducing the risk of major cardiovascular disease events and death in people with a history of cardiovascular disease.

Wu Qiaoqi, Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, pointed out in an article in the Health Times in 2016 that fish is the main source of high-quality protein, containing about 20 grams of protein per 100g, rich in essential amino acids, and high bioavailability. The fat contained in fish is different from meat, and the fatty acid composition is mainly unsaturated fatty acids, especially deep-sea fish is rich in DHA and EPA, which is beneficial to lower blood cholesterol and prevent the occurrence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

 

Japanese longevity is inseparable from “like eating fish”

The “World Health Statistics” report issued by the World Health Organization shows that the average life expectancy of Japanese people has ranked first in the world for many years.

In July 2020, the European Journal of Nutrition published a study of public hygiene from the Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Japan. After analyzing the data of more than 92,000 people, it found that Japanese “seven types of foods often eaten” And “a kind of food that you don’t eat often” may be the secret of Japanese longevity! Among them, the seven types of food commonly eaten by the Japanese include fish.

According to a report by the New Overseas Chinese Daily in Japan, saury festivals are held in many places in Japan every autumn, and the scene of 10,000 people eating fish is not unattractive. Statistics show that the average fish consumption per capita in Japan has increased from more than 70 kilograms to over 100 kilograms each year, even exceeding the per capita consumption of rice, which is more than twice the average per capita consumption of fish in France.

From March to May each year, hexaline fish, squid, clams, perch, herring, etc. have become “seats” on the Japanese table; from June to August, abalone, eel, catfish, black bream, etc. begin Play the leading role; autumn is the world of Kangji eel, plaice, saury, and tuna; winter is the most delicious cod, mackerel, tuna, etc.

Throughout the year, fish is an indispensable dish for every Japanese family table. For example, the eel rice that many people are familiar with, the Japanese, who are less than 2% of the global population, eat 70% of the global eel.

According to data released by the World Health Organization, Japan’s coronary heart disease mortality rate is only 0.041%, the lowest in the world. Among men between the ages of 55 and 64, the death rate of coronary heart disease among Japanese is less than 1/10 of that of American.

 


Eat fish, these three types of fish are best not to eat

But although the fish is good, you can’t think about how to eat it. If you want to eat deliciously, but also ensure your health, there are three types of fish that are best not to eat.

1. Large fish at the top of the food chain

The harmful substances contained in the animals at the top of the food chain are several times, or even ten times, that of the animals in the previous stage, especially the large carnivorous fishes in the ocean.

For example, the mercury content in shark fin far exceeds the standard edible hairtail. This situation also exists in fish such as tuna. Therefore, when choosing fish, it is not recommended to look for large fish, and it is not recommended to eat large carnivorous fish.

2. Oily fish

Because oil fish is cheap and similar in appearance to cod, it is often used by merchants to pretend to be cod. Li Guangping, a national senior food inspector and second-level public nutritionist, pointed out in an article in the Health Times in February 2018 that “oil fish” pretending to be cod. They are Acanthopanax and heteroscale. They contain 20% oil (mostly wax esters), which cannot be digested and absorbed by the human body. Some people may cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting after eating.

3. Pufferfish

Xing Zhebin, chief physician of Xiyuan Hospital of China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, pointed out in an interview with Health Times reporter in 2015: In addition to meat, pufferfish contains tetrodotoxin in its internal organs, especially the ovaries and liver. And tetrodotoxin is a severe neurotoxin. If the meat and internal organs are not completely peeled off, and the meat contaminated by the internal organs is not cleaned, it will cause poisoning if people eat it. So although the meat of puffer fish is delicious, it is best not to eat it.

In addition, when eating fish, it is recommended that steaming is the first choice in the way of fish. Fan Ronghui, a national senior Chinese cook and a second-level public nutritionist, suggested in an article in the Health Times in 2013 that steaming is the first choice for fish, and the cooking method is slightly changed, and the taste is also quite good. In order to prevent the fish protein from coagulating prematurely due to the addition of salt, the seasoning is better after steaming. Sprinkle shredded green onion, ginger and red pepper on the steamed fish, drizzle a little bit of hot oil, add some fish soy sauce, and sprinkle with coriander. The fresh fish is steamed and seasoned to highlight the umami taste of the fish and retain the nutrients to the maximum.

 

 

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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