July 1, 2022

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Nature How old is the limit of human life span?

Nature How old is the limit of human life span?

 


Nature How old is the limit of human life span?  With age, the body’s self-repairing ability begins to decline, and when the repairing ability reaches the limit, people will die.

Aging is a complex, multi-stage, and gradual process that occurs in the entire process of life.   A common sign of aging is that cells slowly lose their ability to produce new healthy cells to repair damage. With age, the body’s self-repairing ability begins to decline, and when the repairing ability reaches the limit, people will die.

Decreased repair ability is characterized by decreased physical function and increased risk of chronic diseases, especially age-related chronic diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. So, how old is the lifespan of human beings?

On May 25, 2021, the research team of Singapore Biotechnology Corporation published a research paper entitled “Longitudinal analysis of blood markers reveals progressive loss of resilience and predicts human lifespan limit” in the journal “Nature Communications“.

 

The study shows that the limit of human life span is between 120-150 years, and the maximum life span is 150 years.

Nature How old is the limit of human life span?

 

 

Researchers conducted a dynamic evaluation of health data from a large number of people in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Russia and found that people lose all their ability to repair before the age of 150. This research confirms to a certain extent the view that “human beings start to die from birth”, and the process will be significantly accelerated around the age of 35 to 45, because the human body’s repair ability declines sharply at this stage.

 

The researchers devised an ingenious strategy, using longitudinal human blood count data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the British Biobank to develop a variable describing the biological age, the Dynamic Organism State Index (DOSI).

 

In fact, DOSI comes from a biomarker in the blood, which indicates an individual’s ability to recover over a period of time. The researchers assessed the biological age and personal recovery ability of the same person through continuous dynamic testing.

 

Nature How old is the limit of human life span?

The development and quantification of aging

 

Analysis shows that for people between the ages of 40-90, the recovery time of DOSI fluctuations will increase with age, and the disease recovery rate will decrease. In other words, the recovery ability of human beings will gradually decrease with the increase of age.

 

With age, the recovery time is getting longer and longer. It takes 2 weeks for a 40-year-old healthy person and 6 weeks for an 80-year-old person.

 

Nature How old is the limit of human life span?

With aging, the ability to recover gradually loses

 

In order to obtain the longest life span, researchers focus on the future of the subject. By plotting a curve where the dose increases linearly with age, researchers can track the correlation and infer the maximum life span.

 

By extrapolating this trend, the research team found that even if people are healthy and do not suffer from major diseases, by the age of 120-150, people will completely lose the ability to recover.

 

Nature How old is the limit of human life span?

According to calculations, the ability to recover is completely lost at the age of 120-150

 

Interestingly, the research results show that even if the most advanced disease treatment methods are available in the future, if the underlying aging problem is not solved, humans will not exceed this limit age.

 

The author points out in the paper that treatments for specific chronic diseases or frailty syndromes are unlikely to improve the apparent limit of human life. Compared with certain diseases, the loss of the body’s ability to recover seems to be a greater driving force for death.

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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