October 3, 2022

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Childhood liver disease rates are rising rapidly: Scientists may find the reason

Childhood liver disease rates are rising rapidly: Scientists may find the reason



 

Childhood liver disease rates are rising rapidly: Scientists may find the reason.

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have found a link between prenatal exposure to various endocrine-disrupting chemicals and an increased prevalence of a potentially carcinogenic liver disease in children.

 

Childhood liver disease rates are rising rapidly: Scientists may find the reason.

 

 

This is the first comprehensive study of the association between prenatal exposure to certain chemicals and chemical mixtures and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Researchers identify cytokeratin-18 as a new marker of the condition in children. These findings, recently published online in JAMA , highlight the implications of understanding prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals as a risk factor for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, an issue that is rapidly becoming more prevalent in children and May lead to severe chronic liver disease and liver cancer in adulthood.

 

“These findings could inform more effective early-life prevention and intervention strategies to address The current epidemic of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.”

 

“We are exposed to these chemicals every day through the food we eat, the water we drink and the consumer products we use,” added senior author Damaskini Valvi, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health and member of the Exponomics Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. This is a serious public health concern. These findings suggest that early life exposure to many endocrine-disrupting chemicals is a risk factor for pediatric NAFLD and draw attention to the need for more investigation to elucidate environmental chemistry How product exposure interacts with genetic and lifestyle factors in the pathogenesis of liver disease.”

 

 

Childhood liver disease rates are rising rapidly: Scientists may find the reason.

 

 

 

NAFLD is one of the most widespread liver diseases in the world, with an increasing number of children being diagnosed with NAFLD, affecting 6% to 10% of the paediatric population and approximately 34% of obese children .

Numerous pesticides, plastics, flame retardants, hazardous metals and other environmental pollutants are classified as endocrine disrupting chemicals.

 

Examples include perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), also known as “permanent chemicals,” used in nonstick cookware and food packaging, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) used as flame retardants in furniture and baby products.

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals interfere with people’s hormonal and metabolic systems. Some experimental studies have shown that exposure to these chemicals can lead to liver damage and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease; however, until now, no studies have been conducted on the potential effects of prenatal exposure to these chemicals in humans.

 

For the study, researchers measured 45 chemicals in the blood or urine of 1,108 pregnant women between 2003 and 2010. These chemicals include endocrine-disrupting chemicals such as PFAS, organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides, plasticizers (phenols, phthalates), PBDEs, and parabens.

When the children were 6 to 11 years old, scientists measured the children’s blood levels of enzymes that indicate risk of liver disease and cytokeratin-18, and found that children who were more exposed to environmental chemicals during pregnancy, these biomarkers level has increased.

 

“By understanding the environmental factors that contribute to fatty liver disease, we can provide people with actionable information by providing actionable information,” said Robert Wright, MD, the Ethel H. to reduce their risk and to make informed choices that reduce the risk or impact of the disease.”

 

“Expomics is the wave of the future because once you have sequenced the human genome (which is already done), there is not much you can do with genomics alone. We have to understand different diseases and the missing piece of the puzzle is measurement their environmental causes, and exposomes are a way to accelerate our understanding of how the environment affects our health.”

 

 

 

 

Childhood liver disease rates are rising rapidly: Scientists may find the reason.

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