July 7, 2022

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Is there a chance of pregnancy after premature ovarian failure?

Is there a chance of pregnancy after premature ovarian failure?


Is there a chance of pregnancy after premature ovarian failure?  One of the clinical features of premature ovarian failure is amenorrhea. Due to the failure of ovarian function, there is no egg to be excreted, leading to infertility. Accompanied by increased blood gonadotropin levels and decreased estrogen levels, there will be a series of low estrogen symptoms such as hot flashes, hyperhidrosis, facial flushing, low libido, osteoporosis, insomnia, memory decline and other menopause Period symptoms.

A young and beautiful girl in her early 20s came to see a doctor during a recent visit. She shyly told the doctor that I have been married for more than a year and the elderly in my family are pressing hard.  She wants to have a baby this year! However, she usually has irregular menstruation, and now her eldest aunt hasn’t been here for nearly half a year. Ask the doctor what to do? The doctor asked her to take blood to check 6 ovarian sex hormones, anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), and transvaginal ultrasound to detect antral follicles.

The results of the examination showed that the situation was not so good. All the indicators pointed to the girl’s premature ovarian failure.

  • AMH<0.01,
  • FSH 90IU/L,
  • LH 50 IU/L,
  • E2<5 pg/mL.

No clear antral follicles were found on both ovaries by transvaginal ultrasound. Proper premature ovarian failure caused amenorrhea and infertility. In the face of the little girl’s ardent eyes, the doctor can only truthfully report her condition. Her ovaries currently have no fertility function, and it is impossible to conceive naturally in this state.

The doctor said that she would do her best to help her adjust the function of the ovaries and use medicine to promote menstruation. As for the fertility problem, it is difficult to solve it. If necessary, it is necessary to cooperate with IVF treatment to see if there is a chance.

Is there a chance of pregnancy after premature ovarian failure?


Premature ovarian failure is not uncommon in clinical practice. The currently recognized diagnostic criteria for premature ovarian failure are as follows:

⑴Age <40 years old

⑵ Amenorrhea time ≥ 6 months

⑶FSH>40mIU/ml in two blood draws (at least 1 month apart)

According to the above indicators, the diagnosis of premature ovarian failure is not difficult, but the cause of premature ovarian failure is very complicated, and most patients cannot find a clear cause.

The following are the causes of premature ovarian failure:

1. Hereditary factors. Chromosome abnormality is one of the main reasons. The most common is the abnormality of the X sex chromosome, that is, the chromosome that represents the female has a problem;

2. Infection, such as herpes simplex virus infection or adenovirus infection;

3. Iatrogenic factors, such as history of ovarian surgery or chemotherapy, radiotherapy, etc. The ovarian tissue becomes smaller and shrunk due to injury;

4. Immune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, thyroiditis, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.;

5. Idiopathic premature ovarian failure, which means that the cause is unknown;

6. Poor living habits and lifestyle, such as long-term alcoholism, smoking, obesity, mental stimulation, etc.

One of the clinical features of premature ovarian failure is amenorrhea. Due to the failure of ovarian function, there is no egg to be excreted, leading to infertility. Accompanied by increased blood gonadotropin levels and decreased estrogen levels, there will be a series of low estrogen symptoms such as hot flashes, hyperhidrosis, facial flushing, low libido, osteoporosis, insomnia, memory decline and other menopause Period symptoms.

With premature ovarian failure, for young women who have fertility requirements, is there no way to think about it? Do you never have a chance to become a mother again? I will introduce this issue in detail in the next section.

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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