March 5, 2024

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The risk of death may increase for seniors who are losing weight

The risk of death may increase for seniors who are losing weight.



 

The risk of death may increase for seniors who are losing weight.

 

As we all know, obesity not only leads to inconvenience in daily life and reduced physical ability, but also increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and even cancer. We often say, “it is hard to get slim when getting old”.

 

However, a recent study suggests that weight loss in healthy elderly people may not be a good thing, as it may be significantly associated with increased mortality rates.

 

Recently, an international research team led by Monash University in Australia published a study entitled “Associations of Change in Body Size With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Healthy Older Adults” in the JAMA Network Open.

The study re-analyzed data from a study of 16,703 healthy participants aged 70 and over (7,510 men and 9,193 women) who took aspirin. The researchers focused on the participants’ weight records, waist circumference measurements, and mortality information.

 

The risk of death may increase for seniors who are losing weight.

 

The results showed that there was a surprising association between changes in body size and mortality rates among healthy elderly people: weight loss and waist reduction were significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality in both men and women.

 

To clarify the relationship between changes in body size and mortality risk, the research team reanalyzed data from a clinical trial of aspirin in 16,703 healthy elderly people aged 70 and above in Australia who did not have significant cardiovascular disease, dementia, physical disability, or other life-threatening chronic diseases.

They focused on changes in their weight and waist circumference and divided everyone into five groups: stable group (changes within 5%), 5-10% weight loss, more than 10% weight loss, 5%-10% weight gain, and more than 10% weight gain.

 

The analysis showed that compared to men with stable weight, men who lost 5%-10% of their weight had a 33% increase in all-cause mortality, and men who lost more than 10% of their weight had a 289% increase in all-cause mortality.

Compared to women with stable weight, women who lost 5%-10% of their weight had a 26% increase in all-cause mortality, and women who lost more than 10% of their weight had a 114% increase in all-cause mortality.

Compared to those with stable waist circumference, those who reduced their waist circumference by more than 10% had a 214% increase in all-cause mortality in men and a 34% increase in all-cause mortality in women. There was no significant association between weight gain or waist circumference gain and all-cause mortality.

 

The risk of death may increase for seniors who are losing weight.

 

The research team stated that weight loss is likely to be an early indicator of various life-shortening diseases.

Although weight loss may occur before cancer diagnosis, studies have shown that weight loss also occurs before an increase in all-cause mortality caused by various reasons, including cardiovascular disease, trauma, dementia, Parkinson’s disease, and other less common causes of death.

 

Weight loss is mainly related to decreased appetite, leading to a decrease in food intake.

The paper describes appetite as a complex process controlled by the central nervous system and various circulating hormones, any of which may be disrupted before more obvious diseases occur.

 

This cohort study on healthy older adults suggests that weight loss is associated with increased mortality and risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other life-limiting illnesses.

The research team concluded that doctors and patients should be aware of the important link between mortality and weight loss in older adults, and if a healthy older adult begins to experience weight or waist circumference loss, it should raise a red flag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paper link :

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2803643

The risk of death may increase for seniors who are losing weight.

(source:internet, reference only)


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