September 25, 2022

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Harvard study: Risks of colorectal cancer doubled if with sweet drinks often

Harvard study: Risks of colorectal cancer doubled if with sweet drinks often

 

Harvard study: Risks of colorectal cancer doubled if drinking sweets often.  Harvard study: People who often drink sweet drinks, at a young age, double the risk of colorectal cancer


If there are risk factors for colorectal cancer, such as ulcerative colitis, a personal or family history of colorectal cancer, or a history of adenomatous polyps, colonoscopy may be required more often.
Sugary drinks, such as soft drinks (carbonated drinks, fruit juices, etc.), sports drinks, fruit-flavored drinks and energy drinks, are one of the main sources of added sugar in the diet.

We know that excessive intake of added sugar can increase the risk of many diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

Recently, a study published in “The Gut” (GUT) added new “criminal evidence” for the harmful health of regular consumption of sugary drinks. The study found that frequent consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during adolescence (13-18 years) and adulthood is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (ie, early-onset colorectal cancer, EO-CRC) before the age of 50.

Harvard study: Risks of colorectal cancer doubled if with sweet drinks often

Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, Harvard University and other institutions analyzed data from the American Nurses’ Health Study II (NHS II), involving 95,464 people aged 25 to Women between 42 years old.

Through the questionnaire, the researchers calculated the subjects’ age, height, weight, menopausal status and other information, as well as factors related to the risk of colorectal cancer, including smoking status, alcohol consumption, exercise level, aspirin consumption, colorectal cancer Family history, colonoscopy screening, etc. At the same time, it also counts the consumption of different foods and beverages in the past 12 months, including red meat, processed meat, fruits, vegetables, as well as sugar-sweetened beverages and beverages without added sugar (such as coffee, water, tea, milk). Wait).

In addition, the researchers also counted the amount of sugar-sweetened beverages consumed by 41,272 subjects during adolescence (13-18 years old). After the start of the study, researchers will follow up the subjects every 4 years to update relevant information.

Researchers’ statistics found that subjects who regularly drank sugar-sweetened beverages as adults often lack exercise, often take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, have low participation in colonoscopy, and have an unhealthy overall diet, such as red meat and processed meat. The intake of vitamins, dietary fiber, folic acid and calcium is low. And subjects who regularly drank sugary drinks between the ages of 13 and 18 were also more likely to experience unhealthy lifestyles such as diet in adulthood.

 

During an average follow-up of 24 years, 109 cases of early-onset colorectal cancer occurred. After adjusting for the influence of other factors, the researchers found that regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages both during adolescence and adulthood were associated with an increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer.

In adulthood, compared with subjects who drank less than 1 cup (8 ounces, about 240ml) of sugary beverages per week, drinking at least 2 cups of sugary beverages a day was associated with a 118% higher risk of early-onset colorectal cancer Related. Drinking 1 cup of sugar-sweetened beverages a day is associated with a 16% increase in the risk of early-onset colorectal cancer.

During adolescence, drinking 1 cup of sugar-sweetened beverages a day is associated with a 32% increase in the risk of early-onset colorectal cancer.

In addition, the researchers also found that replacing sugar-sweetened beverages with water, tea, coffee or milk was associated with a 11%-36% reduction in the risk of early-onset colorectal cancer.

Specifically, if one cup of sugar-sweetened beverages per day is replaced with the same amount (240ml) of water, tea, coffee, low-fat milk or whole milk, the risk of early-onset colorectal cancer will be reduced respectively. 11%, 17%, 18%, 35%, and 36% are correlated.


Researchers analyzed that regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may increase the risk of early-onset colorectal cancer through a variety of mechanisms. For example, regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may inhibit the feeling of fullness and lead to excessive energy intake, thereby increasing the risk of obesity. Obesity is one of the risk factors for colorectal cancer; sugar-sweetened beverages can also promote increased blood sugar levels and Increased insulin secretion may lead to insulin resistance, inflammation and type 2 diabetes in the long run. These metabolic-related symptoms or diseases will also increase the risk of colorectal cancer.

In addition, the main ingredient in sugar-sweetened beverages—fructose, if taken too much, may cause intestinal malnutrition and endotoxemia, damage the intestinal barrier function, increase intestinal permeability, and make the intestinal mucosa suffer. Damage, thereby increasing the risk of colorectal cancer.

Since the study was an observational study, it only showed an association between frequent consumption of sugary beverages and an increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer, and did not indicate a causal relationship. Moreover, the study also has some limitations, such as the adolescent diet depends on the recall of the subjects, the small number of patients with early-onset colorectal cancer, etc., which may also have an impact on the results of the study.

The corresponding author of the study, Dr. Yin Cao of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, pointed out: “In the past two decades, the incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer has been increasing in many countries, but the reason is not clear.” As a result, we recommend that teenagers and young adults should avoid sugary drinks and replace them with tea, water, coffee or milk that do not contain added sugars. This may be a feasible strategy to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer before the age of 50.”

 

In addition, Dr. Yin Cao mentioned that timely colonoscopy can also help reduce the risk of early-onset colorectal cancer. As more and more young people are suffering from colorectal cancer, the average age of diagnosis of this cancer has dropped from 72 to 66 years. The American Cancer Society has lowered the recommended age for first colonoscopy for people at general risk from 50 to 45 years old; for those with other risk factors (such as family history of the disease), it should start earlier.

In China, according to the “Expert Consensus on Early Diagnosis and Screening Strategies for Colorectal Cancer in China”, it is recommended that the 40-74-year-old general population be screened for colorectal cancer, especially the urban population.

Available screening methods are: immunological fecal occult blood test, the recommended screening cycle is once a year; multi-target stool testing, the recommended screening cycle is once every three years or once a year; questionnaire risk assessment, no recommendation Screening cycle, it is recommended to use colorectal cancer screening high-risk factor quantitative questionnaire, Asia Pacific colorectal cancer screening score, opportunistic screening risk score questionnaire; colonoscopy, the recommended screening cycle is 5-10 years, it is recommended to use The colonoscope can reach the ileocecal area.

If there are risk factors for colorectal cancer, such as ulcerative colitis, a personal or family history of colorectal cancer, or a history of adenomatous polyps, colonoscopy may be required more often.

 

 

(source:internet, reference only)


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