May 28, 2022

Medical Trend

Medical News and Medical Resources

Drinking plenty of water every day can reduce the risk of heart failure

Drinking plenty of water every day can reduce the risk of heart failure

Drinking plenty of water every day can reduce the risk of heart failure. 

On August 24, 2021, a study published at the 2021 annual conference of the European Society of Cardiology tells us that supplementing enough water every day can reduce the risk of heart failure (heart failure).

The research leader, Dr. Natalia Dmitrieva of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), said that this research shows that maintaining good hydration can prevent or at least slow down the changes in the heart that cause heart failure. Therefore, we need to pay attention to the amount of water we drink every day. If we find that we drink too little, we must quickly replenish it.

Drinking plenty of water every day can reduce the risk of heart failure

The study recommends a daily fluid intake of 1.6 to 2.1 liters for women and 2 to 3 liters for men. However, surveys around the world show that many people have not reached this range. Serum sodium is an accurate measurement of hydration status: when people consume less fluid, the concentration of serum sodium increases. The body then begins to try to preserve water and activate processes known to cause the development of heart failure.

Dr. Natalia Dmitrieva said: “It is natural for us to believe that hydration and serum sodium should change every day, depending on how much water we drink every day. However, the serum sodium concentration remains in a narrow range for a long time. Internally, this may be related to habitual fluid consumption.”

In this study, researchers investigated whether the middle-aged serum sodium concentration as a measure of hydration habits can predict the development of heart failure 25 years later. They also examined the connection between hydration and wall thickening (left ventricular hypertrophy) of the main pumping chamber of the heart (left ventricle), which is a precursor to the diagnosis of heart failure.

This analysis was conducted among 15,792 adults in the Community Atherosclerosis Risk Study (ARIC). Participants were 44 to 66 years old at the time of recruitment and were evaluated during 5 follow-up visits before the age of 70 to 90.

The researchers divided the participants into four groups based on their average serum sodium concentrations at the first and second follow-up visits (conducted in the first three years): 135–139.5, 140–141.5, 142–143.5, and 144– 146mmol/l group. For each group, the researchers then analyzed the proportion of patients with heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy at the fifth visit (25 years later).

They found that higher blood sodium levels in middle age were related to heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy 25 years later. After adjusting for other factors related to the development of heart failure (age, blood pressure, kidney function, blood cholesterol, blood sugar, body mass index, gender, and smoking status), serum sodium concentration is still significantly related to heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy. For every increase of 1mmol/L in serum sodium concentration in middle age, the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure increased by 1.20% and 1.11% after 25 years.

When the serum sodium exceeds 142mmol/l in middle age, the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure begins to increase at the age of 70-90.

Dr. Natalia Dmitrieva said that the results of this study show that good lifelong hydration may reduce the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. In addition, it has been found that serum sodium exceeding 142mmol/L increases the risk of adverse cardiac effects, which may help determine who can benefit from assessing their hydration levels. Serum sodium levels are within the normal range, and laboratory test results will not be marked as abnormal, but doctors can use them during regular physical examinations to identify those who should usually assess fluid intake.

(source:internet, reference only)


Disclaimer of medicaltrend.org