June 14, 2024

Medical Trend

Medical News and Medical Resources

Maternal antibodies do not inhibit the immune response triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine

Maternal antibodies do not inhibit the immune response triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine



 

Maternal antibodies do not inhibit the immune response triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine.

COVID-19 mRNA vaccine is safe and effective in adults and children, and has been authorized in the United States for population immunization of 6 months and older.

At present, no COVID-19 mRNA vaccine is authorized for use in infants under 6 months old, and infants in this age group mainly rely on herd immunity and maternal antibodies (matAbs) to prevent COVID-19 virus infection .

We have introduced the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy.

COVID-19 mRNA vaccine antigen or Spike-mRNA will not be passed to the fetus through the placenta, but maternal antibodies can be passed to the newborn through the placenta, which can provide at least five Six months of immune protection with detectable IgG/IgA antibodies in breast milk.

Maternal antibodies (matAbs) confer immune protection on the one hand, however, these antibodies can also suppress de novo immune responses triggered by certain vaccines in infants .

Interference by maternal antibodies with vaccine-triggered immune responses can negatively impact infant immunity and may expose infants to a window of infection while they await effective vaccination and subsequent neonatal IgG responses.

 

At present, it is not clear whether maternal antibodies will suppress the immune response caused by COVID-19 vaccine in the baby.

On April 13, 2023 , Scott E of the University of Pennsylvania and Drew Weissman jointly published an article on BioRxiv : Evaluation of mRNA-LNP and adjuvanted protein SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in a maternal antibody mouse model.

Researchers established a novel coronavirus maternal antibody transfer In mouse models, it was found that in the presence of maternal antibodies, the new coronavirus mRNA vaccine can still induce a strong de novo immune response in mouse pups, and recombinant protein vaccines can also circumvent the inhibitory effect of maternal antibodies when co-administered with adjuvants .

While more research needs to be done in humans, their study raises the possibility that COVID-19 mRNA vaccine or recombinant protein vaccine (with adjuvant added) is effective for infants under 6 months old.

 

Maternal antibodies do not inhibit the immune response triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine

 

 

In the absence of maternal antibodies , weaned mouse pups (about 21 days after birth) injected with COVID-19 mRNA vaccine or recombinant protein vaccine can trigger specific IgM and IgG responses. It is worth noting that if the recombinant protein vaccine does not add an adjuvant (PBS) , it cannot trigger an immune response in the pups.

 

Maternal antibodies do not inhibit the immune response triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine

 

 

In the new coronavirus vaccine maternal antibody transfer model , it was found that the specific antibodies triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine in the mother would be transferred to the cubs, and the transfer dose was proportional to the maternal immune dose, and, as the cubs continued to grow after birth, the maternal Antibodies gradually decay.

 

Maternal antibodies do not inhibit the immune response triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine

 

At weaning, mice pups were immunized with COVID-19 mRNA vaccine or recombinant protein vaccine (adding adjuvant or LNP) , and in the presence of maternal antibodies, high titers of specific serum IgG could still be detected in the immunized mice, and Antibody levels were similar to mouse pups without maternal antibodies.

 

Maternal antibodies do not inhibit the immune response triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine

 


Summary

For the 2019-nCoV mRNA and recombinant protein vaccines, maternal antibodies were transferred across the placenta to mouse pups and did not inhibit the pups from being vaccinated to trigger an effective immune response. This study also provides another perspective on the safety of vaccination during pregnancy.

 

 

 

 

 

Maternal antibodies do not inhibit the immune response triggered by COVID-19 mRNA vaccine

(source:internet, reference only)


Disclaimer of medicaltrend.org


Important Note: The information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as medical advice.