December 1, 2022

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University of Iowa: Eating out often increases the risk of death?

University of Iowa: Eating out often increases the risk of death?



 

University of Iowa: Eating out often increases the risk of death?


People who cook frequently in person tend to have a longer lifespan, and the improvement of women is more significant than that of men


With the accelerating pace of work, dining out has become popular all over the world. In recent decades, the proportion of dining out has become higher and higher, the number of restaurants has grown steadily, and the turnover of the catering industry has also increased.


But few studies have linked eating out to health. Although some restaurants can provide high-quality food, the quality of the food in restaurants (especially fast food chains) is generally lower than that of food cooked at home.


There is evidence that eating out has higher energy density, fat and sodium content, while fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and dietary fiber and antioxidants are lower in protective nutrients. A few studies have shown that frequent eating out is associated with increased biomarkers of obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases, but currently little is known about the relationship between eating out and the risk of death.


In May 2021, researchers from the University of Iowa published a titled “Association Between Frequency of Eating Away-From-Home Meals and Risk of All-Cause and Cause-Specific” in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Mortality” research paper.


Researchers studied the relationship between eating out and the risk of death and concluded that frequent eating out is significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause death.

 


University of Iowa: Eating out often increases the risk of death?

 

 


In order to explore the relationship between eating out and mortality, the research team analyzed 35084 adults over the age of 20 who participated in the 1999-2014 National Health and Nutrition Survey. The survey conducted face-to-face family interviews and questionnaire surveys.

Participants reported on their eating habits, including the frequency of eating out. The research team then correlated these records with death records as of December 31, 2015, paying particular attention to all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality, and cancer mortality.


During the follow-up period (median follow-up time 7.83 years, longest follow-up time 16.75 years), a total of 2781 deaths occurred, including 511 cases of cardiovascular disease and 638 cases of cancer. After adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, diet and lifestyle factors, and body mass index, compared with those who eat out less often (less than once a week), they often eat out (two meals a day or more). The risk ratio of all-cause mortality for those with multiple causes was 1.49 (95% confidence interval 1.05-2.13).

The cardiovascular disease mortality hazard ratio was 1.18 (95% confidence interval 0.55-2.55), and the cancer mortality hazard ratio was 1.67 (95% confidence interval 0.87-3.21).

 

University of Iowa: Eating out often increases the risk of death?

 


The research team said that the results obtained from a large nationally representative sample of American adults showed that frequent eating out was significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality.


This is also one of the first studies to quantify the relationship between eating out and mortality. The findings support the view that eating out often is bad for health, and may provide suggestions for future dietary guidelines to reduce the frequency of eating out.

 

University of Iowa: Eating out often increases the risk of death?

 

 


In fact, as early as 2011, Taiwanese scholars published a research paper entitled “Cooking frequency may enhance survival in Taiwanese elderly” in the journal Public Health Nutrition.


The paper shows that people who cook frequently in person tend to have a longer lifespan, and that the improvement of women is more significant than that of men.


Therefore, these two studies tell us that frequent eating out increases the risk of death, and frequent home cooking can prolong life, so people should be encouraged to cook at home.

 

 

 

 

 

Link to the paper: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2021.01.012 https://doi.org/10.1017/S136898001200136X

University of Iowa: Eating out often increases the risk of death?

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